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Explore our EdD Educational Administration and Leadership (Non-Licensure) specialization

The Doctor of Education (EdD) Educational Administration and Leadership specialization is designed for K–12 administrators who want to increase their ability to influence and transform their educational organization. You will learn about sustainability in your particular setting and how to nurture your school to become or remain a thriving learning center. Gain the skills to build an effective, collaborative organization and enhance the K–12 student learning environment. As a graduate of this program, you will be able to integrate theory and practice to positively impact your career and the lives of your students.

PROGRAM SAVINGS

Receive your first course at no cost if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on November 30, 2020. Contact one of our enrollment specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Curriculum

Minimum Degree Requirements

  • 79 quarter credits*
  • 1 face-to-face residency
  • Doctoral Writing Assessment (0 cr.)

To satisfy these completion requirements, you must have access to an administrator, students, and community members associated with a PreK-12 school setting.

Walden students have up to 8 years to complete their doctoral program unless they petition for an extension.

In general, students are continuously registered in the dissertation/doctoral study course until they complete their capstone project and it is approved. This usually takes longer than the minimum required terms in the dissertation/doctoral study course shell.

To complete a doctoral dissertation/doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation/doctoral study process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

This sequence represents the minimum time to completion. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 855-646-5286.

Courses

Course Code Title Credits

FOUNDATION COURSE

Choose one course from the following two courses:

EDDD 8002

Leading the Future of Education

As an advanced graduate student, you are about to embark on one of the most exciting journeys of your life. This practical course provides meaningful skills you will need to select your path, complete your degree, and become a successful leader of educational change in the 21st century. Networking and research skills, scholarly writing, critical thinking, use of Walden resources, and the three advanced graduate paths (e.g., PhD, EdD, EdS)—this course addresses all of these in a manner that provides a solid foundation of skill sets upon which to base your journey. You will find a balance of assignments (e.g., case studies, discussions, application assignments) that will ignite your passion for learning, allow you to collaborate with others, and guide your current and future work. This course is designed to reflect Walden's social change mission and provide you with meaningful tools for success as an advanced graduate student.

(5 cr.)
EDDD 8006

Leading the Future of Education

As an advanced graduate student, you are about to embark on one of the most exciting journeys of your life. This practical course provides meaningful skills you will need to select your path, complete your degree, and become a successful leader of educational change in the 21st century. Networking and research skills, scholarly writing, critical thinking, use of Walden resources, and the three advanced graduate paths (e.g., PhD, EdD, EdS)—this course addresses all of these in a manner that provides a solid foundation of skill sets upon which to base your journey. You will find a balance of assignments (e.g., case studies, discussions, application assignments) that will ignite your passion for learning, allow you to collaborate with others, and guide your current and future work. This course is designed to reflect Walden's social change mission and provide you with meaningful tools for success as an advanced graduate student.

(5 cr.)

CORE COURSES

EDDD 8010

Collaborative Communication for Administrators

Effective education leaders work to foster a community of collaboration in which all stakeholders strive to develop a shared understanding of and commitment to making sure that every student learns and succeeds. Education professionals in this course explore the characteristics of effective collaborative leaders, including the ability to foster collaborative problem solving and decision making. They learn how to model open and responsive communication as well as how to use tools to ensure that such collaboration is the common process within the school and throughout the school community. They also explore the role of schools in communicating with and drawing upon community resources of various types, including public agencies and organizations that serve youth and families. Through this course, education professionals work toward establishing the personal, ethical, and moral platforms to become effective leaders who model and promote ethical and productive civic behavior. Education professionals will develop and refine their skills as collaborative leaders in the school community.

(5 cr.)
EDDD 8011

School Organizational Dynamics: Policies and Law

Educators in this course study selected general legal principles, case and statute law, and law-making agencies that impact leaders and their educational institutions. Key content areas include but are not limited to the legal status of the local school district; the role of federal, state, and local governments that may apply; governance of schools; and policies, rules, and regulations. Education professionals in the course will also cover and develop a practical understanding of the legal rights, responsibilities, and obligations of administrators, teachers, students, parents, and school boards; community education; civil rights; collective bargaining, torts and contracts, and legal research; as well as the development of policy to meet regulations and other provisions. School administrators have an opportunity to become more knowledgeable about finding resources to help them address legal matters as they evolve. Educators will gain the basic knowledge to help develop policy statements as related to their school and to the district as a whole.

(5 cr.)
RSCH 8110

Research Theory, Design, and Methods

In this research course, students are provided with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the graduate level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the role of theory, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research designs and data collection methods are introduced. The alignment of research components is emphasized. Students also explore ethical and social change implications of designing and conducting research. Students demonstrate their knowledge and skills by developing an annotated bibliography. (Prerequisite(s): RESI 8401.)

(5 cr.)
EDDD 8102

Promoting the Success of Diverse Learners

Student diversity comes in many different forms (e.g., linguistic, cultural, socioeconomic, academic, emotional, aesthetic), and effective educators have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to value the richness this diversity brings and enhance learning in their education setting. By applying strategies and evaluating programs and initiatives to meet the diverse needs of all learners, educators can demonstrate an awareness of students' prior learning, language, culture, family, and community values to improve teaching and learning. Through real-world scenarios and applications, educators will assess strategies for promoting equitable access to high-quality learning experiences while recognizing their own personal beliefs and biases. Education professionals will also explore current and effective practices for working with diverse learners and providing productive learning environments for all students. Through the use of appropriate materials and technologies, educators will evaluate curriculum, instruction, and assessment, promoting learning for all students. 

(5 cr.)
EDDD 8113

Tools for Doctoral Research Success

Education professionals seeking the Doctor of Education (EdD) degree are required to make an original contribution to the field of education. The purpose of this course is to help educators begin that process by introducing them to the steps for developing the components of the dissertation—its timeline and available resources. Education professionals examine and analyze selected research to identify questions addressing a specific gap in the existing research literature, the framework and methodology, and other key components necessary to create scholarly research. They also explore resources such as the Writing Center and library, as well as specific tools they can use to complete the dissertation.

(3 cr.)
EDDD 8012

Understanding School Budgets and Allocating Resources

Research on effective schools provides guidance on the most productive ways to organize time, people, money, technology, and other resources. To use these resources most effectively, leaders need to have a strategy that defines the most important priorities, the overall educational design, and the organizational structures that best match the necessary goals for improvement. Education professionals will study and interpret budget documents as they relate to the district at large and then to their portion of the budget as a school. Education leaders will research about writing and seeking grants to enhance a school's or district's options to improve student learning. Effective leaders need to be able to link whole-school strategic plans to effective instructional practices and improved use of time and money. Educational leaders must focus on school improvement, improving teaching quality, and organizing and allocating staff and other resources in the most effective way to continuously improve student performance.  

(5 cr.)
RSCH 8210

Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis

In this research course, students are provided with the opportunity to develop core knowledge and skills for designing and carrying out quantitative research at the doctoral level, including the application of statistical concepts and techniques. Students explore classical common statistical tests, the importance of the logic of inference, and social change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. Students approach statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting appropriate statistical tests for a research design. Students use statistical software to derive statistics from quantitative data and interpret and present results. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8110 or RSCH 7110 or RSCH 6110, and RESI 8401.)

(5 cr.)
EDDD 8044

Leadership and Management for Change in Education

Building on the core knowledge from earlier courses, educators will engage the emerging theories of leadership that reflect the current challenges in culturally responsive education, and the research on motivation and performance. The focus is on entrepreneurial and creative solutions, which reach across P–20 learning organizations to effect positive social change in education.

(5 cr.)
EDDD 8013

Creating and Maintaining Safe, Effective, and Positive Learning Environments

Effective education leaders demonstrate and collaboratively develop capabilities to foster cultures for learning based on mutual respect among students, teachers, staff, parents, and the larger community. Strategies for fairly and effectively administering discipline and resolving conflict are addressed. This course is intended to help leaders understand and treat individual and group differences and potential conflict as opportunities for developing the dispositions, knowledge, and skills that result in social competencies essential to civic participation and interpersonal effectiveness in school and beyond. Education leaders will leave with the knowledge gained from a better understanding of how to address disruptive student behavior and how to deescalate conversations as well as confrontations that are an everyday reality in the school setting. Leaders will also study issues related to safety and violence in schools, considering both methods of prevention and ways to respond to unsafe and violent situations. They can learn how to call upon district and community resources to preserve safety and well-being of the school's population of students and personnel.

(5 cr.)
RSCH 8310

Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis

Students in this research course are provided with the opportunity to develop basic knowledge and skills for conducting qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry, how theory and theoretical and conceptual frameworks uniquely apply to qualitative research, data collection procedures and analysis strategy, and how the role of the researcher is expressed in the ethical and rigorous conduct of qualitative research. Students practice collecting, organizing, analyzing, and presenting data, and they develop a detailed research topic for conducting a qualitative study. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8110 or RSCH 7110 or RSCH 6110, and RESI 8401.)

(5 cr.)
EDDD 8114

Demystifying Doctoral Writing for Research

Education professionals expand their knowledge of the dissertation process by reviewing tools, resources, and sample dissertations as they focus on the alignment among the identified problem, purpose, framework, research question(s), and study design. Education professionals use tools, including the appropriate rubrics and checklists, to narrow the focus of their research topic, plan a comprehensive literature review, and begin to develop their prospectus.

(3 cr.)
EDDD 8014

Recruiting and Retaining Effective School Personnel

Education leaders study human resources policies and practices for recruiting, selecting, hiring, inducting, developing, evaluating, and retaining or dismissing school personnel. Identifying teachers' needs for professional growth is important, but leaders must also ensure that teachers have the opportunity and motivation to use their professional expertise and to participate in ongoing substantial professional development focused on enhancing the learning of every student. Education leaders have the opportunity to evaluate school personnel and ensure teachers are utilized in their areas of strength within the school, and that teachers also receive support and training in any needed areas to promote student learning. They can become knowledgeable about how to hire and retain their novice teachers in order to reduce teacher turnover. As well, school leaders must be able to identify characteristics of productive teacher evaluation processes and programs; distinguish between supervising teaching and supervising learning; and utilize a process and structure for evaluating school personnel that is productive and supportive, motivates improvement, results in retention of highly competent staff members, embodies standards of due process, and takes into account the provisions of the contractual agreements for staff.

(5 cr.)
EDDD 8910

Completing the Prospectus

Nearly all doctoral-level programs require capstone projects that necessitate knowledge of conducting research, including how to develop an appropriate research plan. In this course, educators utilize knowledge from previous courses to develop their prospectus—a brief document that provides preliminary information about their capstone research to serve as a plan for developing the research proposal. They engage in a logical progression from topic conception to prospectus completion. They learn how to take their individualized topic and identify the research problem, purpose of their study, conceptual framework, and appropriate research design, while also examining the concepts of feasibility and overall alignment of study components. Educators will practice evaluating their work using the same guides and rubrics used by faculty.

(3 cr.)
EDDD 8990

Completing the Doctoral Capstone

Nearly all doctoral-level programs require capstone projects that necessitate independent application of requisite knowledge on conducting research based on close interaction with, guidance from, and supervision by an institution-approved committee. Students in each EdD program specialization are supported in the completion of their doctoral capstone in this course. The EdD doctoral study process is composed of several stages and requires levels of approval—prospectus, proposal, IRB, final study, form and style, and chief academic officer (CAO). Students develop and support a doctoral-level research problem and review related literature to develop a framework for the study. They learn how to move from a research problem to the purpose of the study, the framework, and then an appropriate design while examining the concepts of feasibility and overall alignment of study components. Students consider ethical feasibility issues as related to their capstone development and proceed to data collection and analysis. They finalize the capstone with an oral defense, appropriately presenting results and outcomes of the research, as well as implications for positive social change.Students take this course for a minimum of four quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their dissertation with final chief academic officer (CAO) approval.To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the chief academic officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

(5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion)
EDDD 8990

Completing the Doctoral Capstone

Nearly all doctoral-level programs require capstone projects that necessitate independent application of requisite knowledge on conducting research based on close interaction with, guidance from, and supervision by an institution-approved committee. Students in each EdD program specialization are supported in the completion of their doctoral capstone in this course. The EdD doctoral study process is composed of several stages and requires levels of approval—prospectus, proposal, IRB, final study, form and style, and chief academic officer (CAO). Students develop and support a doctoral-level research problem and review related literature to develop a framework for the study. They learn how to move from a research problem to the purpose of the study, the framework, and then an appropriate design while examining the concepts of feasibility and overall alignment of study components. Students consider ethical feasibility issues as related to their capstone development and proceed to data collection and analysis. They finalize the capstone with an oral defense, appropriately presenting results and outcomes of the research, as well as implications for positive social change.Students take this course for a minimum of four quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their dissertation with final chief academic officer (CAO) approval.To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the chief academic officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

(5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion)
EDDD 8990

Completing the Doctoral Capstone

Nearly all doctoral-level programs require capstone projects that necessitate independent application of requisite knowledge on conducting research based on close interaction with, guidance from, and supervision by an institution-approved committee. Students in each EdD program specialization are supported in the completion of their doctoral capstone in this course. The EdD doctoral study process is composed of several stages and requires levels of approval—prospectus, proposal, IRB, final study, form and style, and chief academic officer (CAO). Students develop and support a doctoral-level research problem and review related literature to develop a framework for the study. They learn how to move from a research problem to the purpose of the study, the framework, and then an appropriate design while examining the concepts of feasibility and overall alignment of study components. Students consider ethical feasibility issues as related to their capstone development and proceed to data collection and analysis. They finalize the capstone with an oral defense, appropriately presenting results and outcomes of the research, as well as implications for positive social change.Students take this course for a minimum of four quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their dissertation with final chief academic officer (CAO) approval.To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the chief academic officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

(5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion)
EDDD 8990

Completing the Doctoral Capstone

Nearly all doctoral-level programs require capstone projects that necessitate independent application of requisite knowledge on conducting research based on close interaction with, guidance from, and supervision by an institution-approved committee. Students in each EdD program specialization are supported in the completion of their doctoral capstone in this course. The EdD doctoral study process is composed of several stages and requires levels of approval—prospectus, proposal, IRB, final study, form and style, and chief academic officer (CAO). Students develop and support a doctoral-level research problem and review related literature to develop a framework for the study. They learn how to move from a research problem to the purpose of the study, the framework, and then an appropriate design while examining the concepts of feasibility and overall alignment of study components. Students consider ethical feasibility issues as related to their capstone development and proceed to data collection and analysis. They finalize the capstone with an oral defense, appropriately presenting results and outcomes of the research, as well as implications for positive social change.Students take this course for a minimum of four quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their dissertation with final chief academic officer (CAO) approval.To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the chief academic officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

(5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion)

DOCTORAL WRITING ASSESSMENT

DRWA 8880

Doctoral Writing Assessment

This course is part of Walden's commitment to help prepare students to meet the university's expectations for writing in courses at the doctoral level. In this course, students write a short academic essay that will be scored by a team of writing assessors. Based on the essay score, students will complete or be exempted from additional required writing support needed to meet writing proficiency standards. This required assessment course is free. Students will be enrolled automatically in it at the beginning of their doctoral program.

(0 cr.)
VIEW ALL COURSES Less Courses

Note: Time to completion and cost are not estimates of individual experience and will vary based on individual factors applicable to the student. Factors may be programmatic or academic, such as tuition and fee increases; transfer credits accepted by Walden; program or specialization changes; unsuccessful course completion; credit load per term; part-time vs. full-time enrollment; writing, research, and editing skills; use of external data for the doctoral study/dissertation; and individual progress in the program. Other factors may include personal issues such as the student’s employment obligations, caregiving responsibilities, or health issues; leaves of absence; or other personal circumstances.

Tuition and Fees

Curriculum Requirements Cost Total *
Tuition-Course Work -Block Transfer:    $0 $0 
Tuition-Coursework - Flat Rate Courses:  3 courses $1,210 each $3,630^
Tuition-Course Work - Per Credit Courses:  25 quarter credits $605 per credit coursework and dissertation/doctoral study credits $15,125^
 Tuition - Doctoral Study/Project:  20–140 quarter credits  $605 per quarter hour for dissertation/doctoral study credits $12,100–$84,700*
Technology Fee $160 per quarter $1,280-$4,800*
Residency Fee One Residency $1,175 (virtual)
$1,275 (in-person: travel, lodging and other expenses are additional)
$1,175-$1,275
Estimated Range:     2-Year 8-Year
 
$33,310
$109,530*+
(assuming completion in a 2-year timeframe) (assuming completion in an 8-year timeframe)

These are ranges of what a student can expect in terms of time and tuition cost to complete a degree. It does not include other fees, nor is it adjusted for tuition increases over time. Walden faculty has concluded that generally students who do not complete their program in eight years are unlikely to complete and only allow students to exceed that time frame when a student petitions for an extension and provides good reason for the delay and assurances that obstacles to completion can be overcome. Time is calculated using the time allowed for each semester or unit that the student completes. Students are encouraged to work continuously during the program so as not to extend the time needed to complete the degree as work can become stale and students lose focus. Students who earn two grades of “Unsatisfactory,” who repeatedly drop a course before a semester or unit has been completed, or are unable to complete in the eight year time frame, should expect that they may be dismissed from the program. Walden believes that it is in the best interest of a student who is unable to complete the degree in the stated ranges to strongly consider withdrawal or obtaining a lesser degree.

Time to completion and cost are not estimates of individual experience and will vary based on individual factors applicable to the student. Factors may be programmatic or academic such as tuition and fee increases and/or the student’s transfer credits accepted by Walden; program or specialization changes; unsuccessful course completion; credit load per term; writing, research and editing skills; use of external data for their doctoral study/dissertation; and/or individual progress in the program. Other factors may include personal issues such as the student’s employment obligations; care giving responsibilities or health issues; part-time vs. full-time enrollment; leaves of absence; and/or other personal circumstances.

Tuition and fees are subject to change. Books and materials are not included. Students may incur additional costs for remedial writing assistance, if necessary.

Based on a 2-year minimum completion requirement and an 8-year maximum timeframe as outlined in Walden academic policy.

^This assumes students successfully complete their coursework on the first attempt.

*Tuition and fees will be higher if students petition to extend the 8-year maximum timeframe or choose to take more expensive elective courses.

+Tuition and time to complete may be reduced if transfer credits are accepted, or if you receive grants, scholarships or other tuition discounts. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 855-979-6580.

FINANCIAL AID

Many Walden degree-seeking students—67%—receive some form of financial aid.* Create a customized plan that makes sense for you.

*Source: Walden University’s Office of Financial Aid. Data reports as of 2018.

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PROGRAM SAVINGS

Receive your first course at no cost if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on November 30, 2020. Contact one of our enrollment specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Admission Requirements

To be considered for this doctoral program, you must have a master’s degree from an accredited college or university and meet the general admissions requirements. All applicants must submit a completed online application and transcripts. Depending on program specialization, additional requirements may apply. More information for international applicants.

Learning Outcomes

As a graduate of this program, you will be prepared to:

  • Apply knowledge of current research and trends in education.
  • Effectively communicate with others (e.g., verbal, nonverbal, written, and technology-based).
  • Collaborate with a variety of external stakeholders (teachers, families, community members) to address the diverse learning needs of students.
  • Manage resources effectively for the betterment of the learning environment.
  • Create an effective learning environment to enhance student learning.
  • Utilize technology to support student learning.
  • Demonstrate cultural competence to encourage a diverse learning environment.
  • Demonstrate positive professional dispositions (professional conduct, professional qualities, communication, and collaboration).
  • Use research-based data to promote student learning.
  • Promote positive social change in the learning environment.
  • Design research to address educational problems and contribute to the profession.

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