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Help students build a bright future.

Do you aspire to shape children’s lives as an elementary school teacher? When you pursue a BS in Elementary Education at Walden, you have experts, policymakers, and education leaders who will support you in making the greatest possible difference for your students.

Elementary education bachelor’s programs focus on teaching math, science, reading, and other core subjects to children in grades K–6. Coursework in Walden’s teaching degree program explores the integration of technology in the classroom, building family partnerships, collaboration, and literacy. Learn strategies proven to help young students build confidence and excel in today’s diverse classroom environments.

The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership, a Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP)–accredited college, is dedicated to enhancing educator effectiveness.

Community of Leaders

With more than 65,000 education students and alumni, including more than 150 state teachers of the year, you’ll stand alongside some of the best teachers in America.

Cutting-edge Program

Engage in a cutting-edge program from an CAEP-accredited college dedicated to enhancing educator effectiveness.

Technology-rich Coursework

Technology-rich coursework includes interactive videos and virtual field experiences featuring teachers working with students in their classrooms

Collaborate with Educator Peers

Share ideas and learn with a community of educator peers from across the U.S. through the online classroom.

Certification Preparation

Review test preparation materials and be better equipped to pass the licensure exams required for certification.

Program Savings

Receive a $2,500 grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on November 30, 2020. Contact one of our enrollment specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Curriculum

Degree Completion Requirements

  • 181 total quarter credits (35 courses)
    • General education courses (71 cr.)
    • Lower level courses (15 cr.)
    • Professional core courses (60 cr.)
    • Elective courses (25 cr.)
    • Demonstration teaching (10 cr.)

Students may be eligible to transfer up to 115 credits. At least 66 credits must be completed at Walden.

This sequence represents the minimum time to completion. Time to completion will vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an Enrollment Specialist at 855-646-5286.

Courses

Course Code Title Credits

FIRST-TERM COURSE

HMNT 1001

Living and Learning in a Technological World

Imagine life without cell phones, television, or the Internet. Recent technological developments have significantly altered all aspects of human life: at work; in play; and in personal, family, and social interactions. In this course, students examine the advantages, disadvantages, and controversies of living and learning in an ever-changing technological environment. By exploring multiple perspectives, students discover how technology is changing media, culture, business, health, human behavior, and overall access to information. In a dynamic, reflective, and engaging classroom environment, students use a variety of audio, visual, literary, and artistic resources, to engage in open dialogue. Students are also introduced to the tools essential to success at Walden. Students complete the course with a personalized success plan that provides a customized roadmap and tools that they can use immediately on their journey toward the completion of their bachelor's degree. *Note: virtual, cyber, digital, and asynchronous are used to describe online environments in this course.

(6 cr.)

OTHER GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES

BS in Elementary Education students must take an additional 65 general education credits (71 total) as follows:

  • 10 credits in Written and Oral Communications (must include ENGL 1010)
  • 15 credits in Arts/Humanities (must include ENGL 2050 or other Literature course, and 10 credits in Fine or Performing Arts)
  • 20 credits in Mathematics/Natural Sciences (must include MATH 1040 or STAT 3001, one science course with lab, one additional course, and one additional math course)
  • 20 credits in Social Sciences (must include HIST 2015C, SOCI 4080C, one world history course, and one course in Global Studies, Multicultural Studies, Culture/Ethnic Studies, Linguistic/Language Studies, or Global Religion)

LOWER-LEVEL COURSES

EDUC 1004

Child Development

In this course, education professionals have an overview of physical, cognitive/language, and social and emotional development in children from birth through adolescence. Education professionals examine prevailing philosophies and theories of child development and form their own child development philosophy. Through an exploration across various developmental domains and stages, education professionals investigate the latest research and thinking in regard to conditions that affect children's learning and development, such as risk factors, developmental variations, temperament, rate of maturation, innate abilities, culture, family, community, and societal influences.  

(5 cr.)
HLTH 1000

Concepts of Health Promotion

Initiatives to prevent illness and promote healthy lifestyles are often more effective and cost efficient than efforts to intervene or treat disease, which is why health promotion is an increasingly popular trend in the field of healthcare. In this course, students formulate a definition of health and discuss the many influences that shape our individual and collective perceptions of health. Students consider the health-wellness continuum, including a number of factors, such as behavioral, demographic, psychological, and social forces. They also examine evidence-based methodologies for interventions to promote health and enhance wellness, and they evaluate health information found online to determine credibility and accuracy. Additionally, students reflect on ways to shape their future career in health and to promote positive change.  

(5 cr.)
POLI 1001

American Government and Politics

The air we breathe, the water we drink, and the protection of our lives and property all are affected by the actions of local, regional, and national levels of government. In this course, students learn about the workings of the American government and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizens. Students explore the constitutional foundations and major institutions of American government demonstrated through the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. They engage in a range of assignments, such as an analysis on Supreme Court decisions, to gain an understanding of how the U.S. government functions, including the roles of political parties, elections, voting, and interest groups, as well as how the United States formulates and implements public policy.  

(5 cr.)

PROFESSIONAL CORE COURSES

EDUC 2400

The Professional Educator

Lifelong learning and professionalism are key components of effective teaching. As teacher candidates begin their professional program of study, they review the program requirements including field experience responsibilities and major assessments. Teacher candidates study the dimensions of teacher professionalism through the eyes of social change. After reviewing the code of ethics from a practitioner viewpoint, historical theorists, court cases, and trends in education, candidates focus on what is required to be successful in 21st century schools. This includes an analysis of multiple technological frameworks, and candidates use these frameworks in multiple ways throughout the course. Through readings, voices from the field, virtual field experiences, and reflective experiences, each candidate begins to consider his/her personal philosophy.  ENGL 1010, Math-Algebra.) 

(5 cr.)
EDUC 2401

Diverse and Exceptional Learners in the Elementary Classroom

The dynamics of today's classroom are unique and challenging for teachers and learners. Education professionals in this course explore and analyze issues, complexities, and responsibilities associated with the field of education in the 21st century, including providing equal educational opportunities for all learners, regardless of their abilities and differences. They examine many factors influence learning, including individual experiences, abilities, talents, prior learning, language, culture, and family and community values. Education professionals study special education laws and policies; language diversity; and multiple intelligences. They also address learning theory, diverse learning styles, and practical instructional strategies, and they acquire theoretical and practical knowledge about today's classroom as well as the family and community contexts that influence children's learning and development. EDUC 2400.) 

(5 cr.)
EDUC 2402

Exploring Dimensions of Literacy K-6

In this course, education professionals learn theories, principles, practices, and strategies to support literacy development in the elementary grades. Candidates learn about early literacy development including phonological awareness, concepts of print, and phonics. Strategies for developing vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, writing, content-area literacy, and media literacy are also explored. Through course readings and virtual field experiences, candidates analyze literacy instruction and identify research-based principles that support the literacy and learning of all students, including English language learners. Candidates examine the role of formal and informal assessments in planning and modifying literacy instruction to meet the needs of a diverse student population. Topics include organizing the literacy classroom, differentiating literacy instruction, and involving families to support the literacy development of students. EDUC 2400.) 

(5 cr.)
EDUC 3050

Child Development, Motivation, and Learning

In this course, teacher candidates prepare to understand the social, physical, emotional, and intellectual growth and development of children as related to learning and motivation in the elementary classroom. Teacher candidates explore philosophies and theories of child development and make connections between and among the key topics of development, learning and motivation, and social and cultural diversity. Learning environments and resources (including technology) that support the developmental needs of elementary children are identified and analyzed. In addition, teacher candidates explore the importance of family and community connections to support children's learning; develop strategies for engaging families in the learning process of their children; and consider the role of children's interests and personal experiences when planning instruction. Teacher candidates identify typical and atypical developmental patterns; analyze effectiveness of instructional strategies; and consider the role of specialists in supporting children's growth and development. EDUC 2401.) 

(5 cr.)
EDUC 3051

Collaboration to Support All Learners

In this course, candidates explore strategies for effective communication and collaboration with colleagues, specialists, families, and community agencies to provide support for all children. Candidates examine collaboration strategies that promote the growth and learning of all children in the elementary classroom, including those with exceptionalities, gifted and talented students, and English language learners. Candidates learn about the roles of all participants in collaborative teams, including coteaching and participating in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) process. Candidates examine the role of the school in supporting all learners within the larger community context. They identify factors in the students' environments that may affect their growth and learning and explore strategies for effective collaboration with diverse families. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2402, EDUC 3052.)

(5 cr.)
EDUC 3052

Effective Practices: Planning, Instruction, and Assessment

To help ensure high levels of learning and achievement for all students, today's educators must be knowledgeable about learners and learning and well-versed in effective teaching and assessment practices. In this course, education professionals examine the interrelationships between assessment, teaching, and learning as well as effective practices for applying and integrating these critical components in the K–6 classroom. They gain a historical perspective on the standards and accountability movement and examine standards in their state or local setting. They also explore learning theory in the context of today's challenging educational goals and standards. In this course, education professionals learn and apply research-based practices in effective assessment, curriculum design, and instruction. Through on-site experiences and Virtual Field Experiences, they critically analyze and implement teaching and learning principles and practices that help ensure awareness of the individual and collective needs of students. This course requires a 15 hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. EDUC 2401.) 

(5 cr.)
EDUC 3053

Community Building for Effective Classroom Management

In this course, education professionals learn to create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character to optimize learning for all students. Teachers will learn how to foster a sense of community in the classroom and develop positive relationships with and among students. Age-appropriate skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible grouping structures and for teaching conflict resolution will be presented. The course also provides strategies for building positive relationships, fostering motivation, and engaging in effective communication and problem solving with parents and families. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. EDUC 2401.) 

(5 cr.)
EDUC 3054

Literacy K-6: Instruction and Assessment

Reading, listening, speaking, and writing are skills essential to success in school and in life. In this course, teacher candidates can examine a wide range of effective instructional and assessment practices that support the development of reading, oral language, and written communication for K-6 students. Teacher candidates use research-based approaches to literacy instruction while implementing a variety of assessment tools to identify students' difficulties. Teacher candidates use assessment data to create engaging literacy learning experiences at diverse developmental levels. Topics include the incorporation of technology to support and enrich literacy learning, family involvement, and integrating literacy and learning into the content areas This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2402, EDUC 3052.)

(5 cr.)
EDUC 3055

Social Studies and the Arts K-6: Instruction and Assessment

In this course, candidates prepare to become effective educators of social studies and the arts. As they plan and implement instruction, candidates integrate the major concepts, themes, and modes of inquiry from social studies and the arts. Emphasis is on developing strategies to help students become effective citizens of a democratic and culturally diverse society. Candidates focus on building connections across disciplines and using the arts to foster student engagement and communication and promote their abilities to construct and apply knowledge. Candidates use multiple assessments to measure student progress and modify instruction to address the needs of all learners in diverse classrooms. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 3053, EDUC 3054, EDUC 3056, EDUC 4010, EDUC 4020, American or World History.)

(5 cr.)
EDUC 3056

Integrating Content and Technology to Enhance Learning

In this course, teacher candidates explore strategies for integrating technology across content areas in order to plan units and lessons that support developmental and curricular goals for elementary students. Candidates create learning experiences that promote student motivation and engagement; support exploration, problem solving, and critical thinking; provide opportunities for collaborative and self-directed learning; and foster content area literacy. Candidates explore a wide variety of technology resources, infusing them in instructional planning to help students learn content and become proficient in the use of technology. Candidates examine effective teaching practices, including formative/authentic assessments and scaffolding techniques to support diverse learners. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 3054)

(5 cr.)
EDUC 4010

Mathematics K-6: Instruction and Assessment

This coherent and rigorous approach to teaching and learning K–6 mathematics focuses on conceptual understanding, procedural skills, and application of mathematical knowledge. Coursework also focuses on helping teacher candidates promote problem-solving and communication skills as the core for teaching numbers and operations, algebra, data analysis, probability, measurement, geometry, and the use of manipulatives across math strands. Themes threaded throughout the course include technology, real-world applications, integrating math with other content areas, and building on the strengths and overcoming the challenges of diverse learners. This course includes 15 hours of field experience. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 3054.)

(5 cr.)
EDUC 4020

Science K-6: Instruction and Assessment

In this course, education professionals explore teaching and learning in science, based on the latest research on the most effective methods for teaching appropriate science curriculum from Kindergarten through grade 6. Candidates focus on ways to use developmentally appropriate strategies to promote modes of inquiry and analytical skills in science education. They also explore instructional and assessment strategies to develop children's conceptual understanding of science, particularly relating to the standards for physical, life, and earth and space sciences. Candidates examine and apply integration of science with reading, math, social studies, and technology. Candidates consider their own science content knowledge and explore local professional development opportunities. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 3054 and Lab Science requirement.)

(5 cr.)

ELECTIVE COURSES - Choose Five

Choose Five from any general education category.

DEMONSTRATION TEACHING

EDUC 4030

Demonstration Teaching/Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration in Elementary Education

Demonstration teaching is the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and is an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills. Education professionals participate in orientation activities and then gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of an elementary classroom. Education professionals take full control for 4 consecutive weeks over a 12-week placement, gaining real-world experience and the opportunity to translate theory into practice.Candidates demonstrate the various roles of an elementary educator. Education professionals work closely with, and are evaluated by, their Walden University supervisor, classroom cooperating teacher, and Walden faculty member. During demonstration teaching, all professionals complete the Education Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA), participate in weekly discussions, and complete a collaboration based major assessment. This course requires a 12-week full-time classroom experience at a school approved by Walden University. Completion of all other required coursework.) 

(10 cr.)
VIEW ALL COURSES Less Courses

Tuition and Fees

Curriculum Component Requirements Cost Total *
Tuition 181 total quarter credit hours Non-field experience courses: $325 per quarter hour

Field experience courses: $200 per credit

Total Tuition

$44,200

$9,000

$53,200

Technology Fee Per quarter $160 $2,560


TOTAL $55,760


Transfer up to 115 credits $38,815


Total with Maximum Transfer Credits† $16,945

Test fees for the edTPA are included in the program cost. Walden also reimburses for the cost of Minnesota Teacher Licensure ExaminationsTM (MTLE) Content and Pedagogy exams.

Transfer credit total includes reduction in technology fee as related to reduced number of courses over time.

Tuition and fees are subject to change.

FINANCIAL AID

Many Walden degree-seeking students—67%—receive some form of financial aid.* Create a customized plan that makes sense for you.

*Source: Walden University’s Office of Financial Aid. Data reports as of 2018.

Find Ways to Save

Program Savings

Receive a $2,500 grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on November 30, 2020. Contact one of our enrollment specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to this bachelor’s program, you must have a high school diploma or its equivalent and meet the general admission requirements. All applicants must submit a completed online application and transcripts. More information for international applicants.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of Walden’s online elementary education degree program will be prepared to:

  • Demonstrate content knowledge, skills, and pedagogy appropriate to elementary education.
  • Demonstrate the skills and dispositions of a professional educator.
  • Promote K–6 children’s development and learning across content areas through the design and implementation of engaging, differentiated learning experiences that support children’s development and learning across all domains.
  • Use data to assess student growth to make informed instructional decisions that build on the strengths and meet the needs of individual children.
  • Practice cultural responsiveness to build positive trusting relationships with children, families, and colleagues and to create supportive learning environments for all.
  • Use technology appropriately, resourcefully, and innovatively to personalize and improve teaching and learning.
  • Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with children, families, colleagues, and communities to improve outcomes for every child and effect positive social change.

BSEE Graduates Career Outlook

Begin a Rewarding Career in a Field With High Demand

As current educators retire, qualified elementary school teachers are needed across the nation. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of kindergarten and elementary school teachers is expected to grow by 4% through 2029, adding about 56,000 jobs.1

By earning your elementary education degree online from Walden, you can influence children’s lives through a variety of teaching roles, including:

  • Elementary school teacher
  • Kindergarten teacher in a preschool
  • Sixth-grade teacher in a middle school
  • Virtual elementary school teacher

Career options may require additional experience, training, or other factors beyond the successful completion of this degree program.

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