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Grow as a Leader With a Doctor of Information Technology Degree

In Walden’s Information Technology Leadership specialization, you’ll focus on the skills and expertise required to advance into high-level professional leadership positions. Learn to communicate technical and business concepts to diverse audiences through engaging and realistic simulations. Develop skills in strategic decision making to secure and maintain your organization’s critical data assets. You’ll also explore various approaches to planning, implementing, and executing IT strategies.

IT Leadership Simulators

Build your decision-making skills by delving into realistic learning scenarios based on today’s IT challenges.

Individual Mentoring

Work closely with a faculty mentor who matches your professional interests and communication style throughout your program.

Comprehensive Support

Benefit from research and writing tools and robust support services designed to help guide you toward the doctoral finish line.

Network Building

Join organizations like Women in Technology International and connect with peers who can help you in your career.

Program Savings

Receive up to a $4,000 grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on March 8, 2021. Contact one of our Enrollment Specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Curriculum

Minimum Degree Requirements

  • Doctoral Writing Assessment (0 sem. cr.)
  • Foundation course (3 cr.)
  • Technical Core courses (18 cr.)
  • Research Sequence (10 cr.)
  • Specialization Seminar/Leadership courses (15 sem. cr.)
  • Completion of Doctoral Study
    • Doctoral mentoring course (0 sem. cr.)
    • Doctoral study completion course (3 sem. cr. each term for a minimum of 5 terms until completion, with two 8-week terms taken per semester)
  • Two face-to-face academic residencies

Courses

Course Code Title Credits

DOCTORAL WRITING ASSESSMENT

DRWA 8881

Doctoral Writing Assessment

This course is part of Walden's commitment to help prepare students to meet the university's expectations for writing in courses at the doctoral level. In this course, students write a short academic essay that will be scored by a team of writing assessors. Based on the essay score, students will complete or be exempted from additional required writing support needed to meet writing proficiency standards. This required assessment course is free. Students will be enrolled automatically in it at the beginning of their doctoral program.

(0 sem. cr.)

FOUNDATION COURSE

ITEC 8000

Foundations and Communications for Information Technology

This course introduces students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They develop presentation and written communications skills geared toward developing a high level of competence in professional communication with colleagues, clients, novices, and IT experts. Additionally, students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence. They also have the opportunity to prepare their Professional Development Plan and program of study.

(3 sem. cr.)

TECHNICAL CORE COURSES

ITEC 8240

Advanced Database Systems

In order to create a competitive advantage, organizations store and analyze information in a variety of different formats. This course covers key areas of database systems, such as requirements, design, implementation, security, performance, and scalability. Through a hands-on approach and practical projects, students have an opportunity to design and build database systems using the latest database technologies.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8665

Predictive Analytics for Decision Making

Students in this course are provided with insight into how predictive analytics can be used within organizations. In completing this course, students have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive understanding of how results from predictive analytics can be used by organizations to grow their customer base and run operations more efficiently. This course is oriented toward the practical applications of predictive analytics.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8255

Cyber Crime Prevention and Protection

Combatting cybercrime requires a deep understanding of the mechanisms and techniques that can be used to prevent or at least mitigate against it. In this course students consider the motivations for cybercrime and have the opportunity to develop a comprehensive understanding of the tools that can be used to prevent it, including the deployment of cybercrime prevention strategies. Students build an "ethical hacking" environment with which they can experiment. In addition, the course is directed at providing students with hands-on knowledge of cybercrime prevention for application in the workplace.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8225

Technology Innovation and Change Management

Students in this course are provided with a comprehensive understanding of change models and the impact of change related to technology innovation, adoption, and implementation. Students are presented with both the theoretical and practical perspectives required to manage the design and use of technology to foster growth, innovation, and change within organizations. Course content focuses on how innovation can act as a change enabler and the importance of building readiness for change within organizations.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8250

Requirements and Quality Engineering

In this course students examine requirements of engineering and quality engineering in the context of software engineering. Students are presented with topics on the system engineering life cycle, including requirements, design, integration, transition, operation, maintenance, support, and quality management standards. Course content focuses on issues of requirements and quality engineering, such as the elicitation of requirements, analysis, specification, validation, and change management.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8425

Strategic Technology Management

Students in this course are provided with a detailed understanding of how technology becomes an enabler for business. Students study how information technology (IT) strategies support organizational goals, and how IT strategies can help to create a sustained competitive advantage in business. Students evaluate IT strategies and how best to deploy such strategies in the context of systems or business applications.

(3 sem. cr.)

RESEARCH SEQUENCE

ITEC 8427

Applied Research Methods—Qualitative and Quantitative

Students in this course are introduced to qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods frameworks for inquiry. Quantitative designs that are covered in the course include experimental and quasiexperimental, survey, causal-comparative, evaluation, and existing action research; qualitative designs include case study, phenomenology, grounded theory, and ethnography; and mixed-methods strategies include sequential and concurrent strategies. Students work toward acquiring substantive, foundational knowledge of the philosophy of science as they construct, use, and critique concepts and theories. They can learn to produce knowledge for practice as they examine ethical, social, and political aspects of conducting research. By demonstrating knowledge and the ability to solve problems and test hypotheses, students engage in course assignments that emphasize the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice at the doctoral level.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8437

Quantitative Decision Making for Strategic Analysis

In this course, students develop skills in descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and quantitative techniques, including correlation, t-tests, ANOVA, regression, and various non-parametric methods. Students use quantitative data reduction and analysis and data management techniques, and they learn to utilize software for data analysis. This course is not intended for students to become fully grounded in statistical methods; rather, students learn appropriate questions to ask about data analysis, as well as how to defend their use of specific techniques in professional practice.  

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8447

Qualitative and Case Study Research for Strategic Analysis

Students taking this course have the opportunity to extend their research and general analysis skills as they further explore research methods and project types—specifically, qualitative and case study research methods—that they may incorporate into their own doctoral study. Students explore ways of improving the quality and strategic analysis of organizational information technology (IT). They also focus on how to think in an action-oriented manner, as if they were consultants, so that their own doctoral study work could be applied in action. Finally, students begin to plan their doctoral study by engaging in an iterative process to develop their premise and a draft prospectus that incorporates feedback from peers and the course instructor. Ultimately, students offer the prospectus as a document for review and consideration by potential mentors for their doctoral study.  

(4 sem. cr.)

SPECIALIZATION SEMINAR/LEADERSHIP COURSES

ITEC 8201

IT Leadership Simulator: Integrating Diverse Systems and Leading Technology

In this information technology (IT) leadership course, students delve into a problem-based learning scenario focused on an organizational merger situation. Students investigate which technology set best supports the newly merged organization's IT infrastructure. They also plan for and manage how changes to the new IT infrastructure will address the needs of the organization and its employees across countries, cultures, and diverse business areas.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8202

IT Leadership Simulator: Developing Proactive and Reactive Security Plans

In this information technology (IT) leadership course, students delve into a problem-based learning scenario focused on an organization that has experienced a security breach. Students examine relevant IT governance, security, and privacy issues that are essential to the organization. They gain practical experience in formulating comprehensive proactive and reactive system security plans. Students also explore sound IT management principles in decision making and implementation of broad-scale change.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8203

IT Leadership Simulator: Leading IT in a Dynamic Environment

In this information technology (IT) leadership course, students delve into a problem-based learning scenario in which they confront an impending or proposed disruptive legislative or policy change. Students work though the scenario under the assumption that the dynamic change has a direct societal influence and will affect IT accessibility and/or use. They anticipate effects, examine the societal values driving different choices, determine priorities, and develop a plan to positively influence the formation and implementation of policies for issues in which IT features prominently.

(3 sem. cr.)

ELECTIVE COURSES (Choose Two)

ITEC 8501

Seminar in Information Security

Students in this doctoral seminar focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to information security. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and the strategic and organizational implications of information security, such as secure data, secure networks, vulnerabilities, and computer forensics. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8502

Seminar in IT Systems, Software, and Management

Students in this doctoral seminar focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to IT systems, software, and management. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline as well as strategic and organizational implications of IT systems, software, and management, such as system architecture, software development, and system management. During the majority of the seminar, students will work with colleagues, including faculty, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. Students have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8503

Seminar in Project Management

Students in this doctoral seminar focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to project management of information technology (IT) projects. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and the strategic and organizational implications of project management of IT projects, such as knowledge management, requirements management, and current project management tools and techniques, all within an IT framework. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8504

Seminar in Cloud and Grid Computing

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to cloud and grid computing. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of grid and cloud computing, such as security, availability, architecture, and ownership. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8505

Applied Intelligent Systems Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to the application of intelligent systems. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of applying intelligent systems. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8506

IoT Security and Forensics Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to security and forensics in the context of the Internet of Things (IoT). Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of security and forensics in the context of IoT. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8507

Blockchain in Cybersecurity Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to blockchain technology in the context of cybersecurity. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of blockchain technology in the context of cybersecurity. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8508

Cybersecurity Risk Management Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to cybersecurity risk management. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of cybersecurity risk management. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8509

Multivariate Analysis Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to multivariate analysis. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of multivariate analysis. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8510

Modeling, Optimization, and Application in Data Science Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to modeling, optimization, and application in data science. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of modeling, optimization, and application in data science. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8511

Data Visualization Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to data visualization. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of data visualization. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8512

Research Methods for Data Science Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to research designs for data science. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of research designs for data science. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8513

Middleware for Networked and Distributed Systems Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to middleware for networked and distributed systems. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of middleware for networked and distributed systems. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8514

Requirements and Quality Engineering Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to requirements and quality engineering. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of requirements and quality engineering. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8515

User Interface Design and Evaluation Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to user interface design and evaluation. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of user interface design and evaluation. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)
ITEC 8516

Applied Software Design Techniques Seminar

In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to applied techniques for software design. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of software design. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.

(3 sem. cr.)

DOCTORAL STUDIES COURSES

ITEC 8100

Doctoral Study Mentoring

The purpose of this course is to assist doctoral students in making steady progress toward their doctorate in information technology. The "instructor of record" for a section of the course is the chair of the doctoral study committee. Section participants are the students working with the faculty member at various stages of their doctoral study. Students in this course have a forum for ongoing exchange of ideas, input, and feedback between them and their doctoral study chair as students complete the coursework for the degree.

(0 sem. cr.; five 8-week terms of enrollment to be taken along with the specialization seminar/leadership courses)
ITEC 9000

Doctoral Study Completion

Students demonstrate a scholarly ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience in the final doctoral study. They show how new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, the doctoral study is a rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating its efficacy in the world of information technology. This course is a forum and structure for doctoral students to interact with the chair of their doctoral study committee, as well as other students assigned to the same chair, in order to make steady progress on their individual doctoral study research.Students take this course for a minimum of five terms and are continuously enrolled until completion of their doctoral study with final chief academic officer (CAO) approval.To complete a doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the chief academic officer. Students must also publish their doctoral study on ProQuest before their degree is conferred.

(continuous enrollment in 3 sem. cr. per term for a minimum of five terms until completion, with two 8-week terms taken per semester)
VIEW ALL COURSES Less Courses

Students are continuously enrolled in ITEC 9000 for a minimum of five 8-week terms until completion of their doctoral study with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

To complete a doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their doctoral study on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the doctoral study process in the DIT Process Guide.

8-Year Maximum Timeframe
Students have up to 8 years to complete their doctoral degree requirements. See the policy in the Walden University Student Handbook. Students may petition to extend the 8-year maximum timeframe, but an extension is not guaranteed.

Note: Time to completion and cost are not estimates of individual experience and will vary based on individual factors applicable to the student. Factors may be programmatic or academic, such as tuition and fee increases; transfer credits accepted by Walden; program or specialization changes; unsuccessful course completion; credit load per term; part-time vs. full-time enrollment; writing, research, and editing skills; use of external data for the doctoral study; and individual progress in the program. Other factors may include personal issues such as the student’s employment obligations, caregiving responsibilities, or health issues; leaves of absence; or other personal circumstances.

Tuition and Fees

Curriculum Requirements Cost Total *
Tuition-Coursework 46 semester credits  $995 per semester hour for coursework credits $45,770^
Tuition-Doctoral Study/Project  15–99 semester credits $995 per semester hour for doctoral study/project credits $14,925–$98,505*
Technology Fee $210 per semester $2,100–$5,040*
Residency Fee Two Residencies $1,475 each (in-person: travel, lodging and other expenses are additional) $2,950
Estimated Range:     3.3-Year 8-Year


$65,745
$152,265*+
(assuming completion in a 3.3-year timeframe) (assuming completion in a 8-year timeframe)

These are ranges of what a student can expect in terms of time and tuition cost to complete a degree. It does not include other fees, nor is it adjusted for tuition increases over time. Walden faculty has concluded that generally students who do not complete their program in eight years are unlikely to complete and only allow students to exceed that time frame when a student petitions for an extension and provides good reason for the delay and assurances that obstacles to completion can be overcome. Time is calculated using the time allowed for each semester or unit that the student completes. Students are encouraged to work continuously during the program so as not to extend the time needed to complete the degree as work can become stale and students lose focus. Students who earn two grades of “Unsatisfactory,” who repeatedly drop a course before a semester or unit has been completed, or are unable to complete in the eight year time frame, should expect that they may be dismissed from the program. Walden believes that it is in the best interest of a student who is unable to complete the degree in the stated ranges to strongly consider withdrawal or obtaining a lesser degree.

Time to completion and cost are not estimates of individual experience and will vary based on individual factors applicable to the student. Factors may be programmatic or academic such as tuition and fee increases and/or the student’s transfer credits accepted by Walden; program or specialization changes; unsuccessful course completion; credit load per term; writing, research and editing skills; use of external data for their doctoral study/dissertation; individual progress in the program. Other factors may include personal issues such as the student’s employment obligations; care giving responsibilities or health issues; part-time vs. full-time enrollment; leaves of absence; or other personal circumstances.

Tuition and fees are subject to change. Books and materials are not included. Students may incur additional costs for remedial writing assistance, if necessary.

^This assumes students successfully complete their coursework on the first attempt.

Based on a 3.3-year minimum completion requirement and an 8-year maximum timeframe as outlined in Walden academic policy.

*Tuition and fees will be higher if students petition to extend the 8-year maximum timeframe or choose to take more expensive elective courses.

+Tuition and time to complete may be reduced if transfer credits are accepted, or if you receive grants, scholarships or other tuition discounts. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 844-768-0443.

FINANCIAL AID

Many Walden degree-seeking students—67%—receive some form of financial aid.* Create a customized plan that makes sense for you.

*Source: Walden University’s Office of Financial Aid. Data reports as of 2018.

Find Ways to Save

Program Savings

Receive up to a $4,000 grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on March 8, 2021. Contact one of our Enrollment Specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Admission Requirements

To be considered for this doctoral program, you must have a technical master’s degree or at least three years of relevant professional experience in information technology and meet the general admission requirements. All graduate programs in the School of Technology and Applied Science require the submission of a résumé. Proficiency in at least one modern programming language is highly recommended but not required. All applicants must submit a completed online application and transcripts. More information for international applicants.


Meet Your Faculty

  • Gail Miles

    Program Director

    Dr. Miles has decades of teaching experience, including teaching computer science on campus for more than 25 years and teaching IT online since 2000 in a variety of programs. Her research interests include software engineering education and online education.

    Read Gail's Bio
  • Steven Case

    Core Faculty

    Dr. Case has more than 35 years of engineering, management, executive management, and teaching experience. His management experience includes overseeing software and hardware development projects with teams ranging from three to 37 engineers.

    Read Steven's Bio
  • Robert Duhainy

    Robert Duhainy

    Core Faculty

    Dr. Duhainy has more than 24 years of experience in designing and implementing wireless and cellular networks and 27 years in technology and computer security. His research work includes the use of software agents to safeguard computer networks from attack.

    Read Robert's Bio

Career Outlook

In the field of information technology, demand is high for skilled practitioners, leaders, and educators. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the computer and information technology sectors are expected to add 531,200 new jobs through 2029.1

A Doctor of Information Technology degree with an Information Technology Leadership specialization can prepare you to advance to the highest level of your IT career. Grow as an innovator, leader, and problem-solver and prepare to make a greater impact in your organization and field.

A DIT degree with an Information Technology Leadership specialization can prepare you to pursue career options such as:

  • Data scientist
  • Chief information officer (CIO)
  • Professor
  • Researcher
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of computer and information technology occupations is projected to grow

11%

through 2029.1

A DIT degree with an Information Technology Leadership specialization can prepare you to work in settings such as:

  • Government
  • Public and private labs
  • Universities and colleges
  • Large private organizations (financial, retail, service industry, non-profits)

Career options may require additional experience, training, or other factors beyond the successful completion of this degree program.

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