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Explore our BS in Psychology Forensic Psychology concentration

How can you make an impact on the criminal justice system by using your knowledge of human behavior and psychology? In the Forensic Psychology concentration, you will develop a new perspective on the application of psychological principles, questions of the law that may be relevant to legal proceedings, and other vital areas.

Program Savings

Receive up to a $5,000 Grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on December 13, 2021. Contact one of our Enrollment Specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Curriculum

Degree Completion Requirements

  • 181 quarter credits (1 semester credit equals 1.5 quarter credits)
    • General education courses (46 cr.)
    • Core courses (35 cr.)
    • Concentration courses (30 cr.)
    • Psychology elective courses (15 cr.)
    • General Elective courses (55 cr.)

Students may be eligible to transfer up to 135 credits. At least 45 credits must be completed at Walden.

This sequence represents the minimum time to completion. Time to completion will vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 855-646-5286.

Courses

Course Code Title Credits

First Term Course

HMNT 1001
Living and Learning in the Technological World

Imagine life without cell phones, television, or the internet. Recent technological developments have significantly altered all aspects of human life: at work; in play; and in personal, family, and social interactions. In this course, students examine the advantages, disadvantages, and controversies of living and learning in an ever-changing technological environment. By exploring multiple perspectives, students discover how technology is changing media, culture, business, health, human behavior, and overall access to information. In a dynamic, reflective, and engaging classroom environment, students use a variety of audio, visual, literary, and artistic resources, to engage in open dialogue. Students are also introduced to the tools essential to success at Walden. Students complete the course with a personalized success plan that provides a customized roadmap and tools that they can use immediately on their journey toward the completion of their bachelor's degree.

Note: Virtual, cyber, digital, and asynchronous are used to describe online environments in this course.

(6 cr.)

Core Courses

PSYC 2000
Psychology Seminar

In this survey course, BS in Psychology program majors assess their marketable skills, career needs, and career goals. Students learn to make informed choices and plans regarding graduate training in psychology or other related fields of study, as well as job-seeking skills in psychology. Additional topics covered are introductory-level approaches to critical thinking, information literacy skills, and writing in the format and style of the discipline. Students will also reflect on how their chosen major of psychology relates to Walden's mission of social change. This course is graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Prerequisites

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2001
Cross-Cultural Psychology

Contemporary life requires the ability to relate to people who are different. In this course, students will explore major areas of psychology in light of culture's influence, challenging their own world views and unconscious biases in order to develop greater sensitivity to the impact of cultural differences on interactions in a variety of settings. Topics include definitions and approaches to understanding culture; the role of psychology in understanding bias; cultural aspects of cognition and intelligence; emotion; motivation; development and socialization; disorders; and applications of cross-cultural psychology.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2005
Social Influences on Behavior

Individuals are often influenced by others and by the social situations in which they find themselves. Students in this course examine the basic concepts and applications of social psychology, including attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; stereotyping; prejudice and discrimination; interpersonal relationships; group behavior; and the effect of environmental stress on behavior. They also learn how bias can sway objective conclusions as well as how ethical factors influence research in social psychology. Students apply principles and theories presented in the course to case studies and situations in daily life, including instances of stereotyping and discrimination. They also use these theories to understand strategies for helping others and reducing aggressive behavior.

Prerequisites

BS in Health Studies Health Psychology and Behavior Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Human Services Child and Adolescent Development Concentration

  • None

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

BS in Public Health Psychology and Behavior Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2009
Theories of Personality

This course is an introduction to the theoretical approaches to understanding personality. Students examine key theorists and theories including psychoanalytic, neopsychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, biological, behaviorist, and social-cognitive approaches. Perspectives on personality are applied to personal and social issues.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 OR PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3002
Introduction to Basic Statistics

A hallmark of science is the use of numbers to convey research findings; understanding these numbers has both practical and academic value. In this course, students examine basic statistical principles and vocabulary, differentiating methods of data analysis, and interpreting statistical results. The goal of the course is for students to better understand the importance of statistics in research.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000
  • MATH 1030

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • MATH 1030

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3003
Methods in Psychological Inquiry

A variety of factors may cloud judgment when interpreting experiences.In this course, students learn about research methods that psychologists use to test hypotheses in an objective and systematic manner to minimize biases, providing a framework for more accurate conclusions. Students examine experimental and non-experimental methods, issues related to the validity and reliability of measurement, dependent and independent variables, sampling, and ethical concerns related to psychological research.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000
  • PSYC 3002

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 3002

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4010
Psychology Capstone

In this course, students integrate knowledge and skills attained through their psychology coursework to create a final Capstone Paper that examines one area of psychology through a professional lens. In addition, students engage in scholarly discourse about key issues and theories, including ethics, learned throughout the program. Finally, students reflect on their experience in the program and consider career possibilities that might utilize their learning while considering ways to contribute to positive social change.

Prerequisites

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2000
  • PSYC 2001
  • PSYC 2009
  • PSYC 3002
  • PSYC 3003

(5 cr.)

Concentration Courses

In addition to the four required courses, choose two additional courses from the other four described below.
Required
PSYC 2101
Introduction to Forensic Psychology

Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3004
Psychological Disorders

Psychological disorders form the basis of diagnosis in psychology. In this course, students examine a wide variety of common psychological disorders, including mood, thought, anxiety, substance abuse, sexual, personality, and dissociative disorders. Students also explore underlying causes, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments. They examine concepts of normal and abnormal as related to psychology, methods used in the process of diagnosis, and the measurement of psychological functioning. Students also differentiate among disorders and learn limits to effective diagnosis. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students demonstrate their understanding through practical application and case study assignments.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4920
Applications of Forensic Psychology

In this course, students gain the contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working in the field of forensic psychology. The American Psychological Society's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology--Law Society's Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology are mainstays in this course. Additionally, the various roles and responsibilities of a forensic psychologist are covered.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2000
  • PSYC 2101 or FPSY 2101

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2101 or FPSY 2101

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4110
Forensic Evaluation

In this course students are introduced to the basic procedures for interviewing and evaluating individuals within the legal system. Students learn about various interview and evaluation strategies, including unique challenges presented when working with special populations. In addition, effective behavioral observation strategies are identified. Methods for effectively recording information from interviews and observations are covered, and best practices for preparing forensic reports are presented.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2000
  • PSYC 2101 or FPSY 2101

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2101 or FPSY 2101

(5 cr.)
Choose two courses from the following:
CRJS 3002
Courts and Judicial Process

The pathways through the judicial process begin with choices—from a decision to arrest through the pursuit of a case in the system. In this course, students analyze and apply information about the components of the judicial system, including their structure, function, and processes. Students examine the professional roles within the system and learn how the system selects these figures. They learn about judicial conduct and professional standards and apply these concepts to examples of judicial behavior. Students also analyze issues related to the courts and judicial process in an increasingly diverse society and consider these in regard to future trends, such as in cases and legal claims.

Prerequisites

BS Criminal Justice

  • CRJS 1001 or PSPA 1002 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or FPSY 2101 or CRJS 2002

BS in Human Services

  • CRJS 1001 or PSPA 1002 or FPSY 2101 or CRJS 2003

BS in Psychology Forensic Psychology Concentration

  • CRJS 1001 or PSPA 1002 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or FPSY 2101 or CRJS 2002

All Other Programs

  • CRJS 1001 or PSPA 1001
  • CRJS 2003

(5 cr.)
CRJS 4102
The Criminal Mind

What makes a criminal unique? Criminal justice professionals confront criminal behavior in many forms. In this course, students explore theories and research that provide cognitive, behavioral, and psychological explanations of criminal behavior. Through the examination of such theories, students have the opportunity to gain the professional knowledge and sensibilities to be able to interact effectively with offenders. Students also investigate potential trends and current biological research that may change or advance the study and treatment of criminal behavior.

Prerequisites

BS Criminal Justice

  • CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003 or FPSY 2101

BS in Psychology Criminal Justice and Forensic Psychology Concentrations

  • CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003 or FPSY 2101

All Other Programs

  • CRJS 1001

(5 cr.)
CRJS 4201
Restorative Justice

Criminal justice involves more than retribution; it is twofold in that it must punish offenders and also address their needs and the needs of victims and the community. Students in this course explore the theory of justice and practices that emphasize repairing the harm caused by criminal behavior. They learn the ways in which this effort contrasts with an adversarial approach to justice. Students learn about strategies involving stakeholders in actions that transform the relationships among victims, offenders, communities, and criminal justice agencies in their response to crime. They also explore and reflect on case studies and topical models for an in-depth understanding how professionals conduct restorative justice in the real world.

Prerequisites

BS Criminal Justice

  • CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003 or FPSY 2101

BS in Human Services Criminal Justice Concentration

  • CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003 or FPSY 2101

BS in Psychology Criminal Justice Concentration

  • CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003 or FPSY 2101

All Other Programs

  • CRJS 1001

(5 cr.)
CRJS 4203
Introduction to Victimology

There are many considerations related to the perception, needs, and treatment of crime victims, which continue to lend to a growing area of study and legislation. Students in this course learn about the different types of victimization as well as the differences between direct and indirect victims of crime. They examine the role of criminal justice practitioners who work with and respond to victims. Students also assess and discuss the many ethical issues related to victims' human and civil rights and the impact of these rights on criminal justice professionals and changing legislation. Through case studies and contemporary literature, students also analyze both current problems and future trends in victimology.

Prerequisites

BS Criminal Justice

  • CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003 or FPSY 2101

BS in Human Services Criminal Justice Concentration

  • CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003 or FPSY 2101

BS in Psychology Criminal Justice and Forensic Psychology Concentrations

  • CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003 or FPSY 2101

All Other Programs

  • CRJS 1001

(5 cr.)

Psychology Electives

Choose any three 3000-level, 4000-level, or 5000-level courses in the School of Psychology.

General Electives

Choose 11 courses from General Education, BS in Psychology, Criminal Justice, Accelerate into Master’s courses, or other Walden bachelor’s degree programs. At least one course must be at the 3000, 4000, or 5000 level. Elective credits must total 55 credits to meet the BS in Psychology program requirements
VIEW ALL COURSES Less Courses

Tuition and Fees

Curriculum Component Requirements Cost Amount
Tuition 181 quarter credit hours $325 per quarter hour $58,825
Technology Fee Per quarter $160 $2,560


  $61,385*

Effective February 28, 2022

Curriculum Component Requirements Cost Amount
Tuition 181 quarter credit hours $333 per quarter hour $60,273
Technology Fee Per quarter $165 $2,640


  $62,913*

*Tuition reflects the minimum time to completion. Time to completion varies by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. Tuition and time to complete may be reduced if transfer credits are accepted, or if you receive grants, scholarships or other tuition reductions. Walden may accept up to 135 transfer credits. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 844-768-0109.

Tuition and fees are subject to change. Books and materials are not included and may cost up to an additional $5,000.

FINANCIAL AID

Many Walden degree-seeking students—67%—receive some form of financial aid.* Create a customized plan that makes sense for you.

*Source: Walden University’s Office of Financial Aid. Data reports as of 2018.

Find Ways to Save

Program Savings

Receive up to a $5,000 Grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on December 13, 2021. Contact one of our Enrollment Specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Admission Requirements

Admission is considered for adult students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent. Applicants must also meet one of the following criteria:

  • You are 21 years of age or older.
  • You are less than 21 years of age with at least 12 quarter credits.
  • You are an active member of the military or a veteran with documentation of service.

More information for international applicants.

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