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Explore our BS in Psychology Criminal Justice concentration

Through the Criminal Justice concentration, explore cognitive, behavioral, and psychological theories of criminal behavior from the serial killer to the terrorist. Discover and analyze types of victimization and how to work with victims of crime as you prepare for or grow your career in the fields of criminal justice, social service, or law enforcement.

Program Savings

Receive a $2,500 grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on November 30, 2020. Contact one of our enrollment specialists to learn more.

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Curriculum

Degree Completion Requirements

  • 181 total quarter credits
    • General education courses courses (46 cr.)
    • Core courses (35 cr.)
    • Concentration courses (35 cr.)
    • Psychology elective courses (20 cr.)
    • Elective courses (45 cr.)

Students may be eligible to transfer up to 135 credits. At least 45 credits must be completed at Walden.

This sequence represents the minimum time to completion. Time to completion will vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an Enrollment Specialist at 855-646-5286.

Courses

Course Code Title Credits

FIRST-TERM COURSE

HMNT 1001

Living and Learning in a Technological World

Imagine life without cell phones, television, or the Internet. Recent technological developments have significantly altered all aspects of human life: at work; in play; and in personal, family, and social interactions. In this course, students examine the advantages, disadvantages, and controversies of living and learning in an ever-changing technological environment. By exploring multiple perspectives, students discover how technology is changing media, culture, business, health, human behavior, and overall access to information. In a dynamic, reflective, and engaging classroom environment, students use a variety of audio, visual, literary, and artistic resources, to engage in open dialogue. Students are also introduced to the tools essential to success at Walden. Students complete the course with a personalized success plan that provides a customized roadmap and tools that they can use immediately on their journey toward the completion of their bachelor's degree. *Note: virtual, cyber, digital, and asynchronous are used to describe online environments in this course.

(6 cr.)

CORE COURSES

PSYC 1001

Introduction to Psychology

In this course, students will be introduced to the scientific study of observable behavior and internal experiences such as thoughts and feelings. Psychological facts, principles, and theories associated with methods of analysis, learning, memory, brain functioning, sensation, perception, motivation, emotions, personality, social behavior, human development, and psychological disorders and treatment will be introduced. Students will learn to understand human behavior by examining the integrative influences of biological, psychological, and social-cultural factors. The concepts in this course will prepare psychology majors for more in-depth study of the major areas of psychology, and will provide a foundational understanding of human behavior for non-psychology majors.

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2000

Psychology Seminar

In this survey course, BS in Psychology program majors assess their marketable skills, career needs, and career goals. Students learn to make informed choices and plans regarding graduate training in psychology or other related fields of study, as well as job-seeking skills in psychology. Additional topics covered are introductory-level approaches to critical thinking, information literacy skills, and writing in the format and style of the discipline. Students will also reflect on how their chosen major of psychology relates to Walden's mission of social change. This course is graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001.)

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2001

Cross-Cultural Psychology

Contemporary life requires the ability to relate to people who are different. In this course, students will explore major areas of psychology in light of culture's influence, challenging their own world views and unconscious biases in order to develop greater sensitivity to the impact of cultural differences on interactions in a variety of settings. Topics include definitions and approaches to understanding culture; the role of psychology in understanding bias; cultural aspects of cognition and intelligence; emotion; motivation; development and socialization; disorders; and applications of cross-cultural psychology. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2009

Theories of Personality

This course is an introduction to the theoretical approaches to understanding personality. Students examine key theorists and theories including psychoanalytic, neopsychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, biological, behaviorist, and social-cognitive approaches. Perspectives on personality are applied to personal and social issues. PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3002

Introduction to Basic Statistics

A hallmark of science is the use of numbers to convey research findings; understanding these numbers has both practical and academic value. In this course, students examine basic statistical principles and vocabulary, differentiating methods of data analysis, and interpreting statistical results. The goal of the course is for students to better understand the importance of statistics in research.   PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3003

Methods in Psychological Inquiry

A variety of factors may cloud judgment when interpreting experiences.In this course, students learn about research methods that psychologists use to test hypotheses in an objective and systematic manner to minimize biases, providing a framework for more accurate conclusions. Students examine experimental and non-experimental methods, issues related to the validity and reliability of measurement, dependent and independent variables, sampling, and ethical concerns related to psychological research. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000 or PSYC 3002.)

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4010

Psychology Capstone

In this course, students integrate knowledge and skills attained through their psychology coursework to create a final Capstone Paper that examines one area of psychology through a professional lens. In addition, students engage in scholarly discourse about key issues and theories, including ethics, learned throughout the program. Finally, students reflect on their experience in the program and consider career possibilities that might utilize their learning while considering ways to contribute to positive social change.   (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 2000, and PSYC 2101.)

(5 cr.)

CONCENTRATION COURSES

In addition to the three required courses, choose two additional courses from the other six described below.

REQUIRED

PSYC 2002

Human Development: Childhood and Adolescence

Humans experience many developmental changes throughout the lifespan, but those of greatest significance occur from conception to young adulthood. In this course, students examine key theories related to various aspects of development in infants, children, and adolescents. Students apply social, biological, and cognitive maturation processes and perspectives to better understand their own development and personal experiences. They also discuss related topics, such as cross-cultural issues, attachment and temperament, language and personality development, and puberty and sexual development.   (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2005

Social Influences on Behavior

Individuals are often influenced by others and by the social situations in which they find themselves. Students in this course examine the basic concepts and applications of social psychology, including attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; stereotyping; prejudice and discrimination; interpersonal relationships; group behavior; and the effect of environmental stress on behavior. They also learn how bias can sway objective conclusions as well as how ethical factors influence research in social psychology. Students apply principles and theories presented in the course to case studies and situations in daily life, including instances of stereotyping and discrimination. They also use these theories to understand strategies for helping others and reducing aggressive behavior.   (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3004

Psychological Disorders

Psychological disorders form the basis of diagnosis in psychology. In this course, students examine a wide variety of common psychological disorders, including mood, thought, anxiety, substance abuse, sexual, personality, and dissociative disorders. Students also explore underlying causes, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments. They examine concepts of normal and abnormal as related to psychology, methods used in the process of diagnosis, and the measurement of psychological functioning. Students also differentiate among disorders and learn limits to effective diagnosis. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students demonstrate their understanding through practical application and case study assignments.   PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 

(5 cr.)

Choose two courses from the following:

CRJS 2001

Criminology and Social Control

People commit crimes for a variety of reasons, and these crimes vary in their impact on individual victims and society. Students in this course examine a range of views, definitions, and perspectives on crime and criminology; the nature, causes, and typologies of crime and offenders; theories that attempt to explain why individuals commit crimes; and approaches to the prevention and control of crime. Students apply theories and perspectives to crime in real life as well as to crime presented in vignettes and case studies. Students devote special attention to the debate between social-responsibilities and social-problems approaches to criminology.   (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003.)

(5 cr.)
CRJS 3010

Profiling Serial and Mass Murderers

Law enforcement officials characterize serial murder among one of the most abhorrent of all criminal behavior. In this course, students examine the interest in serial and mass murder in popular culture and explore typologies and theories of criminal behavior. They assess and discuss the history and evolution of profiling; roles, goals, and responsibilities of profilers; the use of profiling in criminal investigations; and populations victimized by serial and mass murderers. Students also apply typologies and criminal theories to real-world case scenarios. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003.)

(5 cr.)
CRJS 4102

The Criminal Mind

What makes a criminal unique? Criminal justice professionals confront criminal behavior in many forms. In this course, students explore theories and research that provide cognitive, behavioral, and psychological explanations of criminal behavior. Through the examination of such theories, students have the opportunity to gain the professional knowledge and sensibilities to be able to interact effectively with offenders. Students also investigate potential trends and current biological research that may change or advance the study and treatment of criminal behavior.   (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)

(5 cr.)
CRJS 4201

Restorative Justice

Criminal justice involves more than retribution; it is twofold in that it must punish offenders and also address their needs and the needs of victims and the community. Students in this course explore the theory of justice and practices that emphasize repairing the harm caused by criminal behavior. They learn the ways in which this effort contrasts with an adversarial approach to justice. Students learn about strategies involving stakeholders in actions that transform the relationships among victims, offenders, communities, and criminal justice agencies in their response to crime. They also explore and reflect on case studies and topical models for an in-depth understanding how professionals conduct restorative justice in the real world.   (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)

(5 cr.)
CRJS 4202

Mobilizing and Coordinating Community Response

While victim response is vital, it is also important to focus on the potential effects of crime on a community, such as economic instability, drug use, prejudices, and further criminal activity. Students in this course identify existing community resources that professionals use in conjunction with planned and ad hoc community responses to learn positive and effective intervention strategies that address the needs of individuals and communities affected by criminal incidents. They also assess the challenges inherent in such efforts and discuss ways to mitigate obstacles. Gaining new perspectives on possible ways to address the coordination of community response, students examine how victims perceive crime and/or change their role as a result of the crime. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)

(5 cr.)
CRJS 4203

Introduction to Victimology

There are many considerations related to the perception, needs, and treatment of crime victims, which continue to lend to a growing area of study and legislation. Students in this course learn about the different types of victimization as well as the differences between direct and indirect victims of crime. They examine the role of criminal justice practitioners who work with and respond to victims. Students also assess and discuss the many ethical issues related to victims' human and civil rights and the impact of these rights on criminal justice professionals and changing legislation. Through case studies and contemporary literature, students also analyze both current problems and future trends in victimology.   (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)

(5 cr.)

PSYCHOLOGY ELECTIVES

Choose all four listed below or choose any four 3000-level or 4000-level courses from the other BS in Psychology concentrations.

PSYC 3005

Racial and Ethnic Identities

Most people recognize and appreciate the individuality of human beings, including race and ethnicity as related to self-perception and to the perception of others. In this course, students explore their own racial and ethnic identities in the context of contemporary psychological knowledge as well as contemporary issues and challenges related to race and ethnicity. Students explore and discuss a variety of topics, including the development of racial and ethnic identities; social classification; privilege and stigma; perceptions of racial and ethnic identities; assimilation; inequalities in race and ethnicity; and the relationship of race and ethnicity to social change. Students apply psychological concepts to better understand their own sense of ethnic and racial identities and how these identities shape their experiences in the world.   PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3006

Psychology of Gender

Researchers have demonstrated that there are few psychological differences between men and women. And yet history and conventional thinking indicate otherwise. Students in this course are introduced to the basic theories, principles, and applications of gender and gender differences. Students explore distinctions between sex and gender, masculinity and femininity, and sexuality and sexual orientation; gender differences in social behavior, perception, and cognitive abilities; and cross-cultural research on gender and sexuality. Through discussions and applications, students debunk myths surrounding sex and gender similarities and differences, and they apply theories to case examples and individual experiences. PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3007

Influence and Persuasion

Students in this course examine major concepts and theories of influence and persuasion. Understanding the psychology of influence and persuasion, and recognizing how we use it in daily interactions—or how we experience it used by others—is a vital component of making positive decisions about relationships and careers, as well as everyday challenges and opportunities in our lives. Students will apply specific theories to common situations to analyze and evaluate the impact of influence and persuasion on their own and others' attitudes, beliefs, and behavior. Particular areas of study include influence and persuasion in daily communication; cultural considerations; media and consumer behavior; and politics and leader influence. Throughout the course, students also apply self-reflection strategies to case studies and their personal experiences and also assess the ethical aspects of influence and persuasion. PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4006

Global Perspectives in Psychology

While traditional psychology in the United States has been Western in focus, increased globalization has promoted an examination into human behavior from a broader perspective that includes the influence of cultural and global trends on individual and group behavior. In this course, students explore a variety of global perspectives in psychology as well as some of the issues and controversies facilitated by differing cultures. They explore and discuss trends and research methods in global psychology, indigenous psychology, psychotherapy in a global world, and the role of psychologists internationally. Students critically evaluate psychological issues from a global rather than a domestic perspective.   PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 

(5 cr.)

REMAINING ELECTIVE COURSES

Choose nine courses from General Education, BS in Psychology, or other Walden bachelor’s degree programs. At least four credits must be at the 3000–4000 level. Elective credits must total 45 credits to meet the BS in Psychology program requirements.

VIEW ALL COURSES Less Courses

Tuition and Fees

Curriculum Component Requirements Cost Total *
Tuition 181 total quarter credit hours $325 per quarter hour $58,825
Technology Fee Per quarter $160 $2,560


TOTAL $61,385


Transfer up to 135 credits $45,795


Total with Maximum Transfer Credits† $15,590

The tuition reflects the minimum time to completion. Time to completion varies by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an Enrollment Specialist at 855-646-5286.

*Tuition and fees are subject to change. Books and materials are not included and may cost up to an additional $5,000.

†Maximum transfer credit total includes reduction in technology fee as related to reduced number of courses over time.

‡The BS in Psychology to MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling Accelerate Into Master's (AIM) program option requires one additional credit, for a total of 182 credits.

FINANCIAL AID

Many Walden degree-seeking students—67%—receive some form of financial aid.* Create a customized plan that makes sense for you.

*Source: Walden University’s Office of Financial Aid. Data reports as of 2018.

Find Ways to Save

Program Savings

Receive a $2,500 grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on November 30, 2020. Contact one of our enrollment specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Admissions Requirements

Admission is considered for adult students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent. Applicants must also meet one of the following criteria:

  • You are 21 years of age or older.
  • You are less than 21 years of age with 60 quarter credit hours.
  • You are an active member of the military or a veteran with documentation of service.

You are concurrently enrolled in an approved partner institution with an articulation agreement with Walden.
More information for international applicants.

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