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How to Select the Right School for Your MSN Degree

With the right information, you can choose the nursing school that’s best for you.

Earning a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN degree) can qualify you for some of the top nursing careers. But knowing you want to earn a master’s in nursing is not the same as knowing which university’s MSN program is right for you. After all, there are a lot of options. Here’s what you need to consider when looking at nursing schools.

Accreditation

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In order to earn a credible master of science in nursing degree, you need to attend a university with an accredited MSN program. Specifically, you should look for Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) accreditation. CCNE is a national accreditation agency focused on ensuring the quality and integrity of nursing degree programs and residency programs. When a university has CCNE accreditation, you can be certain it provides nursing education that meets the highest standards.

A Variety of MSN Degree Specializations

Many master’s in nursing programs offer a variety of MSN degree specializations, allowing you to focus on the area you most prefer. By offering specializations, a university demonstrates a strong commitment to nursing and an ability to educate students in all nuances of the profession. MSN degree specializations a university may offer include:

Quality Faculty

Whether you want to be a nurse practitioner or a nurse educator, or enter another field of MSN nursing, you want to be as prepared as possible, which means being taught by experts. When looking at MSN programs, verify that the faculty is doctorally prepared. If they are, that’s a good indication that your instructors can provide you with the knowledge and mentoring you need to be your best.

Good Resources

Universities with good MSN programs should also provide plenty of student resources. Take time to review the resources of your preferred universities and make sure they offer a wide range of support. In particular, look for resources that can help with your writing and career planning. Additionally, make sure they are easily accessible.

The Right Learning Environment

If you’re a working RN looking to make the move from RN to MSN, or if you have any other type of full-time job, it might be difficult for you to attend a campus-based MSN program where class times could interfere with your work schedule. Fortunately, there’s a another option: online education.

When you enroll in an online nursing school, you won’t have to worry about traveling to a campus. In fact, online MSN programs allow you to complete the majority of your coursework from home or from anywhere else you have internet access. Additionally, when you earn your master’s in nursing online, you can take advantage of online learning’s flexible scheduling, which gives you the ability to attend class when it works best for you. You can even enroll in an RN to MSN online program that allows you to earn both your bachelor’s and your master’s degrees in less time and at a lower cost than earning each degree separately.

So, which online university should you choose? If you want one that meets all the criteria mentioned above, look no further than Walden University. Walden’s MSN program is CCNE accredited, offers multiple specializations, is staffed with a faculty that’s 100% doctorally prepared, and connects students with exceptional resources to help their education and career. It’s why Walden is the leading provider of advanced nursing degrees in the U.S., producing more MSN graduates than any other university.* Its quality programs can help you make the most of your nursing career.

Walden University is an accredited institution offering a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree program online with eight specializations. Expand your career options and earn your degree using a convenient, flexible learning platform that fits your busy life.


*Source: National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) IPEDS database. Retrieved July 2017, using CIP code 51.3801 (Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse). Includes 2016 preliminary data.

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