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Prepare to Teach in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling Programs

In the PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision with a specialization in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling, you’ll look at human sexuality and empirically supported treatments and techniques for promoting the well-being of couples. Build competencies for working effectively with children and adolescents. You’ll also learn how to assess procedures for evaluating research in this area—and how to apply these findings to your practice.

Explore Family Issues

Examine family structures, life-cycle dynamics, intergenerational influences, and healthy family functioning.

Earn a PhD While Working

Offered fully online, our flexible PhD program makes it possible to balance your doctoral studies with other life commitments.

Connect With Peers

Small class sizes and regular opportunities for engagement allow you to forge deeper connections with your peers and faculty.

Thrive With Doctoral Support

Walden offers doctoral tools and support services that help make every phase of your student journey enriching and successful.

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Curriculum

Minimum Degree Requirements

For students who are licensed professional counselors with a master’s degree in counseling or who have graduated from a CACREP-accredited program:*

  • 100 quarter credits
  • Doctoral Writing Assessment
  • Foundation course (1 cr.)
  • Core courses (30 cr.)
  • Specialization courses (15 cr.)
  • Research courses (20 cr.)
  • Field Experience Courses
    • Practicum (3 cr.)
    • Internship (6 cr.)
  • Completion of Doctoral Dissertation
    • Dissertation Support Courses (5 cr.)
    • Dissertation Writing Courses (5 cr. per term for a minimum of four terms; taken continuously until completion)
  • One face-to-face residency
  • Two Pre-Practicum Labs (6 weeks online, 4 days face-to-face)

*Learn more about completion requirements for students who are not licensed professional counselors with a master’s degree in counseling or who have not graduated from a CACREP-accredited master’s program.

Due to the practicum requirements of this program, the applicant must be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States or a U.S. territory at time of admission and must reside in the United States or a U.S. territory at time of admission to be eligible for this program. United States military personnel stationed abroad should contact an Enrollment Specialist to determine eligibility.

Walden students have up to eight years to complete their doctoral program unless they petition for an extension. In general, students are continuously registered in the dissertation/doctoral study course until they complete their capstone project and it is approved. This usually takes longer than the minimum required terms in the dissertation/doctoral study course shell.

Please refer to Walden’s catalog for more information about degree requirements.

This sequence represents the minimum time to completion. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 855-646-5286.

Courses

Course Code Title Credits
COUN 8001
Foundations of Graduate Study in Counselor Education and Supervision

Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to counselor educators and supervisors.

(1 cr.)
COUN 8110
Professional Orientation, Ethics, and Identity

Students in this doctoral-level course work toward preparing their professional identity as counselor educators and supervisors. They explore the professional orientation and characteristics of counselors, counselor educators, and supervisors as well as related ethical and legal issues encountered in daily work situations. Students engage in discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of competencies and responsibilities of counselor educators and supervisors. Students also examine the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and other relevant standards of practice as well as multicultural issues related to counselor preparation training. Through this course, students have the opportunity to gain professional awareness and create a professional development plan that can be implemented throughout their degree program.

(5 cr.)
RSCH 8110
Research Theory, Design, and Methods

In this research course, students are provided with core knowledge and skills for understanding, analyzing, and designing research at the graduate level. Students explore the philosophy of science, the role of theory, and research processes. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research designs and data collection methods are introduced. The alignment of research components is emphasized. Students also explore ethical and social change implications of designing and conducting research. Students demonstrate their knowledge and skills by developing an annotated bibliography.

Prerequisites

Doctor of Social Work

  • SOCW 8110 or SOCW 8110W

PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision

  • COUN 8001
  • COUN 8110
  • RESI 8801C

PhD in Social Work

  • SOCW 8110 or SOCW 8110W

All Other Programs

  • RESI 8401

(5 cr.)
COUN 8125
Teaching in Counselor Education

In this course, students prepare to become competent teachers of counselor education through the examination of various adult learning theories and methods to work effectively with different learning styles, cultural dynamics, and diversity. Counselor educators in training learn how to help counseling students acquire and apply knowledge and skills, and they examine methods to evaluate learning outcomes. Students also have the opportunity to examine effectiveness within their personal teaching practice. Incorporating knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions learned throughout the course, students have opportunities to design curriculum, teach in a variety of settings, evaluate, and receive feedback as a counselor educator in training. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8001, COUN 8110, and RESI 8801C.)

(5 cr.)
COUN 8115
Advanced Counseling Theories

There are many counseling theories available for professional use in practice. It is the responsibility of the counselor, however, to understand these theories, know which to use in specific settings and situation, and decide which are best suited to his or her own style or methods. In this course, students explore and evaluate major traditional and contemporary theories of the counseling profession, including psychoanalytic, person-centered, rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), multicultural, feminist, and solution-focused. Students apply these and other theories to diverse populations and settings. They also consider how they might advise students and supervisees who use these theories, and they analyze related challenges in teaching and supervising. In doing so, students consider the impact of their own psychosocial, racial, and ethnic identities. Finally, students develop a personal integrative theoretical orientation. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8110 and RESI 8801C.)

(5 cr.)
RSCH 8210
Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis

In this research course, students are provided with the opportunity to develop core knowledge and skills for designing and carrying out quantitative research at the doctoral level, including the application of statistical concepts and techniques. Students explore classical common statistical tests, the importance of the logic of inference, and social change implications of conducting quantitative research and producing knowledge. Students approach statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting appropriate statistical tests for a research design. Students use statistical software to derive statistics from quantitative data and interpret and present results.

Prerequisites

Doctor of Social Work

  • RSCH 8110K or RSCH 8110W

PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision

  • RSCH 8110
  • RESI 8801C

PhD in Social Work

  • RSCH 8110K or RSCH 8110W

All Other Programs

  • RSCH 8110 or RSCH 7110 or RSCH 6110
  • RESI 8401

(5 cr.)
COUN 8135
Clinical Supervision

Clinical supervision of counselors and counselors in training requires in-depth knowledge of major conceptual approaches, methods, and techniques; evaluation; and ethical and legal issues related to supervisory interactions and responsibilities. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop their professional identity and learn the skills of a clinical supervisor. Throughout this course, students engage in experiential applications, discussions, and self-reflective assignments that focus on the strategies for working with supervisees representing diverse backgrounds and developmental and learning styles. After a critical analysis of the purpose of supervision, theoretical frameworks, and models of supervision, students develop and apply their own theory of supervision in a practice setting in which each participant oversees a group of practicum students. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8110, COUN 8115, and COUN 8125.)

(5 cr.)
RSCH 8310
Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis

Students in this research course are provided with the opportunity to develop basic knowledge and skills for conducting qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore the nature of qualitative inquiry, how theory and theoretical and conceptual frameworks uniquely apply to qualitative research, data collection procedures and analysis strategy, and how the role of the researcher is expressed in the ethical and rigorous conduct of qualitative research. Students practice collecting, organizing, analyzing, and presenting data, and they develop a detailed research topic for conducting a qualitative study.

Prerequisites

Doctor of Social Work

  • RSCH 8110K or RSCH 8110W

PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision

  • RSCH 8110
  • RESI 8801C

PhD in Social Work

  • RSCH 8110K or RSCH 8110W

All Other Programs

  • RSCH 8110 or RSCH 7110 or RSCH 6110
  • RESI 8401

(5 cr.)
CPLB 802L
Pre-Practicum 1: Enhancing Teaching and Research Skills

In Pre-Practicum 1, students examine their professional identity as counselor-educators and develop key components of a research plan. Students develop these skills through the practice of teaching and the acquisition of enhanced research knowledge. Topics include roles, responsibilities, philosophy of, and best practices within teaching. Students also develop research questions, align research questions and methodologies, explore social change in research, and explore literature critique and synthesis.

Prerequisites

  • RSCH 8210
  • RSCH 8310
  • COUN 8115
  • COUN 8125
  • COUN 8135

(0 cr.)
COUN 8120
Professional Consultation, Program Evaluation, and Leadership

In this course, students work toward increasing their knowledge and skills related to the roles of consultant and program evaluator in community agencies, mental health settings, P–12 schools, and university settings. Through a variety of practical discussions and assignments, students explore leadership theory and skills; systems theory; consultation models and processes; program evaluation models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional issues; and availability of funding sources. Students synthesize knowledge and apply skills to case studies and real-life examples. They also apply the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) standards to an evaluation of the components of a counselor education program. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8115.)

(5 cr.)
COUN 8203
Survey Research Methods

An in-depth study of a range of survey methods administered via in-person interview, self-report, phone interview, and Internet administration is introduced in this course. Topics will include survey design, administration, analysis, and addressing sources of bias. Students also review theoretical and empirical research on question and questionnaire effects. Students prepare in the practice of writing questions and designing questionnaires, both in general and in light of existing research. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8110, RSCH 8210, and RESI 8801C.)

(5 cr.)

Advanced Research Course

One of the following RSCH courses is required:
RSCH 8260
Advanced Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis

Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in the prerequisite quantitative reasoning course and are presented with opportunities to apply them. They are provided with more specialized knowledge and skills for conducting quantitative research at the doctoral level, including understanding multivariate data analysis and applying more advanced statistical concepts, such as factorial ANOVA, mediation, moderation, logistic regression, ANCOVA, and MANOVA. Students explore existing datasets and apply suitable statistical tests to answer research questions with social change implications. In this course, they approach statistics from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis on selecting the appropriate statistical tests for more complex research questions and social problems. Students use statistical software to perform analyses and interpret and present results. They will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by carrying out a quantitative research project.

Prerequisites

Doctor of Social Work

  • RSCH 8210K or RSCH 8310K or RSCH 8210W or RSCH 8310W

PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision

  • RSCH 8110
  • RSCH 8210
  • CPLB 802L

PhD in Social Work

  • RSCH 8210K or RSCH 8210W or RSCH 8310K or RSCH 8310W

All Other Programs

  • RESI 8402

(5 cr.)
OR
RSCH 8360
Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis

Students build upon the knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8310 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. and have experience applying them. Students develop a more sophisticated understanding of the theoretical antecedents and practical applications of eight contemporary qualitative approaches. Students gain experience developing qualitative interview guides, collecting data, and managing the process from transcription through analysis. The unique challenges of confidentiality and ethical issues are explored as well as implications for social change. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan using a topic relevant to their capstone.

Prerequisites

Doctor of Social Work

  • RSCH 8210K or RSCH 8310K or RSCH 8210W or RSCH 8310W

PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision

  • RSCH 8110
  • RSCH 8310
  • CPLB 802L

PhD in Social Work

  • RSCH 8210K or RSCH 8210W or RSCH 8310K or RSCH 8310W

All Other Programs

  • RESI 8402

Note: This course was previously RSCH 8350.

(5 cr.)
OR
RSCH 8460
Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis

Students build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8210 - Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and RSCH 8310 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis for more specialized knowledge and skills to design mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students are provided with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. They gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question(s). The emphases of this course are on integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practice in data analysis, and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a mixed-methods research plan that incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements appropriately.

Prerequisites

PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision

  • RSCH 8110
  • RSCH 8210
  • RSCH 8310
  • CPLB 802L

PhD in Social Work

  • RSCH 8210K or RSCH 8210W or RSCH 8310K or RSCH 8310W

All Other Programs

  • RSCH 8110 or RSCH 7110 or RSCH 6110
  • RSCH 8210 or RSCH 7210 or RSCH 6210
  • RSCH 8310 or RSCH 7310 or RSCH 6310
  • RESI 8402

Note: This course was previously RSCH 8450.

(5 cr.)
CPLB 803L
Pre-Practicum 2: Advanced Supervision, Teaching, and Research Skills

In Pre-Practicum 2, students continue to examine and strengthen their professional identity while gaining the teaching and supervision experiences that are required by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP). A complement to both the Clinical Supervision and Teaching in Counselor Education courses, students in this Pre-Practicum have the opportunity to enhance and demonstrate advanced teaching skills and clinical supervision both online and in face-to-face environments. During the Pre-Practicum, students will also enhance their knowledge of research methodologies and alignment of research, and they design and present a research proposal to inform and develop their research skills.

Prerequisites

  • CPLB 802L
  • COUN 8203
  • COUN 8120

(0 cr.)
COUN 8551
Preparing for Dissertation

The focus of this course is on the preparation for the dissertation phase of training. In this course, students identify a dissertation topic and potential dissertation committee members; begin to conduct a literature review; develop a problem statement and research questions; and evaluate research designs, methods, and types of analyses to use for their dissertation. Students also complete their initial premise in this course and an annotated outline of their prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, which helps students organize, delineate, and make decisions regarding their doctoral study and appropriate research methodology. It is strongly recommended that students take this course after they have successfully completed all research courses in their program of study. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8120, RSCH 8203, RSCH 8260 or RSCH 8360 or RSCH 8460, and CPLB 802L.)

(5 cr.)
COUN 8890
Counseling Doctoral Practicum

Counseling Doctoral Practicum is an advanced clinical experience as the first of a three-part practitioner capstone experience before dissertation. During the practicum course, students work toward gaining and applying new and advanced clinical knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions. Students must secure a field experience site, apply with the Office of Field Experience within the published application window, and earn approval before being eligible for practicum enrollment. Once enrolled, students will spend a minimum average of 8–10 hours per week at the site that they have secured. They will complete direct counseling hours using the new and advanced skills, weekly individual or triadic supervision with their site supervisor, administrative duties, and other activities as assigned by the site. Concurrently, students will participate in weekly case conceptualization activities, 2 hours of group supervision per week with their faculty supervisor, and other clinically relevant assignments directly related to the work at the site. There are multiple synchronous components of this course. Students must be prepared to be flexible in meeting the demands of this course. (Prerequisite(s): All core courses in the program of study, all residencies, and approval by the Office of Field Experience.)

(3 cr.)
COUN 8356
Advanced Theories and Techniques in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling

This is an advanced course in the study and application of family systems theory. Students apply content knowledge gained in earlier courses 6201/6726 and other core courses to complex and comprehensive case studies. The case studies are rich and inclusive of current issues in family and couples counseling, such as the impact of technology, crisis intervention, addiction, school and community factors, ethical dilemmas, socio-cultural considerations, and issues related to social justice and advocacy. Students engage in the processes of clinical assessment, treatment planning, goal writing, care coordination, discharge planning, clinical documentation, ethical practice, and safety planning. Course work also cultivates students' case conceptualization and case presentation skills.

(5 cr.)
COUN 8895
Doctoral Internship I

Counseling Doctoral Internship I is the second of a three-part capstone experience before dissertation. During the Doctoral Internship I course, site contacts, and individual and group supervisors guide and evaluate students on their ability to synthesize and apply the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions in a minimum of three of five Counseling Educator domains (Teaching, Supervision, Leadership/Advocacy, Counseling, and Research). Students must secure field experience site(s) for each domain of focus, apply with the Office of Field Experience within the published application window, and earn approval before being eligible for Doctoral Internship I enrollment. Once enrolled, students will spend a minimum average of 25–35 hours per week at the site(s) that they have secured. They will complete activities directly related to the approved domains, weekly individual or triadic supervision with their individual supervisor, administrative duties, and other activities the site assigns. Concurrently, students will participate in weekly course discussion and assignments that promote developing a professional identity as a Counselor Educator, 2 hours of group supervision per week with their faculty supervisor, and other domain-relevant assignments directly related to the work at the site. There are multiple synchronous components of this course. Students must be prepared to be flexible in meeting the demands of this course. (Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Counseling Doctoral Practicum and approval by the Office of Field Experience.)

(3 cr.)
COUN 8361
Human Sexuality

Students are provided with a framework for understanding human sexuality in the context of couple, marriage, and family counseling in this course. Students explore empirically supported counseling approaches related to sexual functioning, intimacy, gender, and sexual orientation. They use a systemic framework for understanding the role and impact of sexuality on couples, marriages, and families. Students also explore and discuss specific topics related to issues of sexual diversity, gender identity, sexual offending, trauma, and victimization. Legal and ethical issues related to addressing sexuality in counseling are addressed.

(5 cr.)
COUN 8896
Doctoral Internship II

Counseling Doctoral Internship II is the third of a three-part capstone experiences before dissertation. During the Doctoral Internship II course, site contacts and individual and group supervisors guide and evaluate students on their ability to synthesize and apply the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions in a minimum of three of five Counseling Educator domains (Teaching, Supervision, Leadership/Advocacy, Counseling, and Research). Students must secure field experience sites for each domain of focus, apply with the Office of Field Experience within the published application window, and earn approval before being eligible for Doctoral Internship II enrollment. Once enrolled, students will spend a minimum average of 25–35 hours per week at the site(s) that they have secured. They will complete activities directly related the approved domains, weekly individual or triadic supervision with their assigned individual supervisor, administrative duties, and other activities the site assigns. Concurrently, students will participate in weekly course discussions and assignments that promote on developing a well-rounded professional identity as a Counselor Educator, 2 hours of group supervision per week with their faculty supervisor, and other domain-relevant assignments directly related to the work at the site. There are multiple synchronous components of this course. Students must be prepared to be flexible in meeting the demands of this course. (Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Counseling Doctoral Internship I and approval by the Office of Field Experience.)

(3 cr.)
COUN 8346
Child and Adolescent Counseling

In this course, students examine empirically supported theories and techniques for working with children and adolescents in the counseling process. Students work toward enhancing their theoretical and practical understanding of the systemic interplay among children, adolescents, families, and the stakeholders in their lives. They engage in coursework and readings focused on a family-systems view of intervention, and they devote special attention to developmental, cognitive, behavioral, educational, multicultural, and environmental issues. Students assess a distinct group of empirically supported interventions aimed at improving individual and family functioning. They also explore the legal and ethical issues related to counseling children and adolescents.

(5 cr.)
COUN 8561
Dissertation

Doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their program of study into a research study through which they explore a specific area of interest in this course. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members through a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with their dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 8561, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation .for a minimum of four terms.Students take this course for a minimum of four quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their dissertation with final chief academic officer (CAO) approval.To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the chief academic officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.  (Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of COUN 8896.)

(5 cr. per term for a minimum of four terms until completion)
VIEW ALL COURSES Less Courses

Students are continuously enrolled in COUN 8561 for a minimum of four quarters until completion of their dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

To complete a doctoral dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

Eight-Year Maximum Time Frame
Students have up to eight years to complete their doctoral degree requirements. See the policy in the Walden University Student Handbook. Students may petition to extend the eight-year maximum timeframe, but an extension is not guaranteed.

Note: Time to completion and cost are not estimates of individual experience and will vary based on individual factors applicable to the student. Factors may be programmatic or academic, such as tuition and fee increases; transfer credits accepted by Walden; program or specialization changes; unsuccessful course completion; credit load per term; part-time vs. full-time enrollment; writing, research, and editing skills; use of external data for the doctoral study/dissertation; and individual progress in the program. Other factors may include personal issues such as the student’s employment obligations, caregiving responsibilities, or health issues; leaves of absence; or other personal circumstances.

Tuition and Fees

Curriculum Requirements Cost Total *
Tuition-Coursework 80 quarter credits  $560 per quarter hour for coursework credits $44,800^
Tuition-Dissertation  20–115 quarter credits $560 per quarter hour for dissertation credits $11,200–$64,400*
Technology Fee $160 per quarter $1,920–$5,120*
Residency Fee One Residency $1,375 each (virtual)
$1,475 each (in-person: travel, lodging and other expenses are additional)        
$1,375–$1,475
Pre-Practicum Labs   Two in Program $1,375 each (virtual)
$1,475 each (in person: travel, lodging and other expenses are additional)
$2,750–$2,950
Estimated Range:     3.25-Year 8-Year
 
$62,045
$118,745 *+
(assuming completion in a 3.25-year timeframe) (assuming completion in an 8-year timeframe)

These are ranges of what a student can expect in terms of time and tuition cost to complete a degree. It does not include other fees, nor is it adjusted for tuition increases over time. Walden faculty has concluded that generally students who do not complete their program in eight years are unlikely to complete and only allow students to exceed that time frame when a student petitions for an extension and provides good reason for the delay and assurances that obstacles to completion can be overcome. Time is calculated using the time allowed for each semester or unit that the student completes. Students are encouraged to work continuously during the program so as not to extend the time needed to complete the degree as work can become stale and students lose focus. Students who earn two grades of “Unsatisfactory,” who repeatedly drop a course before a semester or unit has been completed, or are unable to complete in the eight year time frame, should expect that they may be dismissed from the program. Walden believes that it is in the best interest of a student who is unable to complete the degree in the stated ranges to strongly consider withdrawal or obtaining a lesser degree.

Time to completion and cost are not estimates of individual experience and will vary based on individual factors applicable to the student. Factors may be programmatic or academic such as tuition and fee increases and/or the student’s transfer credits accepted by Walden; program or specialization changes; unsuccessful course completion; credit load per term; writing, research and editing skills; use of external data for their doctoral study/dissertation; and/or individual progress in the program. Other factors may include personal issues such as the student’s employment obligations; care giving responsibilities or health issues; part-time vs. full-time enrollment; leaves of absence; and/or other personal circumstances.

Tuition and fees are subject to change. Books and materials are not included. Students may incur additional costs for remedial writing assistance, if necessary.

^This assumes students successfully complete their coursework on the first attempt.

Based on a 3.25-year minimum completion requirement and an 8-year maximum timeframe as outlined in Walden academic policy.

*Tuition and fees will be higher if students petition to extend the 8-year maximum timeframe or choose to take more expensive elective courses.

+Tuition and time to complete may be reduced if transfer credits are accepted, or if you receive grants, scholarships or other tuition discounts. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 844-642-0198.

FINANCIAL AID

Many Walden degree-seeking students—67%—receive some form of financial aid.* Create a customized plan that makes sense for you.

*Source: Walden University’s Office of Financial Aid. Data reports as of 2018.

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Admission Requirements

Program Admission Considerations: A master's degree or higher.

General Admission Requirements: Completed online application and transcripts. Please note that the materials you are required to submit may vary depending on the academic program to which you apply. More information for international applicants.

Meet Your Academic Team

  • Elisabeth Suarez

    Elisabeth Suarez

    Academic Coordinator

    Dr. Suarez has taught counseling master’s and doctoral students since 1997 in face-to-face, blended, and online formats. Her research interests include cross-cultural issues in counseling and supervision and supervision techniques. Dr. Suarez regularly presents at national and regional counseling conferences.

  • Tracy Senstock

    Tracy Senstock

    Senior Academic Program Director

    Dr. Tracy Senstock has been training counselors and counselor educators since 1988. She has served in counseling program administration since 1990 where she has achieved CACREP accreditation both new and renewals for many programs. Dr. Senstock is a licensed professional counselor in Colorado and a National Certified Counselor.

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