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Caryn Leonard-Wilde

Contributing Faculty

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

School of Counseling

Degree Program M.S. Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Caryn Leonard-Wilde is a doctoral student (ABD) in Walden University’s Counselor Education and Supervision doctoral program. She graduated from Hunter College with a Master of Science in Education in Rehabilitation Counseling and has been in the counseling field as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) for over 10 years. Caryn Leonard-Wilde is also a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) in the state of New York and has experience working with diverse populations of adults. She has worked in higher education with students with disabilities for nine years. Most recently, she completed her doctoral internship working in private practice with adults with neurodiversity. Additionally, Caryn Leonard-Wilde has over five years of experience teaching as an adjunct professor in master’s-level rehabilitation counseling and mental health counseling programs and has focused her teaching on clinical instruction and supervision in counseling skills and techniques and practicum. She also has experience teaching Multicultural Counseling and Program Development and Evaluation. At Walden University, she teaches master’s-level Techniques in Counseling courses.

Caryn Leonard-Wilde’s current research interests focus primarily on the experiences of sexual minority counselor educators, the use of self-disclosure and authenticity by counselor educators and supervisors, and counselor education pedagogy. She has presented at the North Atlantic Region Association of Counselor Educators and Supervisors (NARACES) conference. She currently serves as a board member in higher education for a clinical rehabilitation counseling program.

Courses Taught

COUN 6316 - Techniques of Counseling

Education

MS, Hunter College - New York, NY United States

BA, University at Albany - Albany, NY United States

Presentations

Leonard-Wilde, C. (2018). Enhancing Supervision through Self-Disclosure of Marginalized Invisible Identity Markers .