Walden’s Ph.D. in Management is one of the few management Ph.D. programs offered online.

This program takes an interdisciplinary approach to the field of management and its influence on the development of individuals and society.

You will conduct original research in a specific area of interest as you explore theories, concepts, and techniques that build the foundation for sound decision making. Our Ph.D. in Management program can help prepare you to meet the challenges and opportunities in your profession and your organization and enhance your capabilities as a researcher, scholar, manager, or consultant.

This program will provide you with the tools to help you change your world and the world of others.

An ACBSP-Accredited Management Ph.D.

ACBSP LogoWalden University’s Ph.D. in Management program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Among other benefits, ACBSP accreditation provides:

  • Validation that your program meets nationally recognized standards of quality endorsed by businesses, government, and other organizations.
  • Assurance that your program can provide you with the skills you need to compete in today’s global marketplace.
  • Recognition by employers, graduate schools, and regulatory organizations.
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  • Reaching Your Goals

    Halimi Hassan

    Halimi Hassan, Ph.D. in Management student, is learning theory and putting it into practice as he works toward his lifelong goal of a Ph.D. 
    Watch now

  • Steps to your Ph.D. in Management

    Ten Steps to Ph.D. in Management Video

    Watch this step-by-step guide to earning your online doctorate in management at Walden.

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  • Our Academic Resources

    Our Academic Resources

    “Our international students receive dedicated support from their faculty and advisors.”
    Dr. Sreeroopa Sarkar, Faculty Member

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  • Student Support Services

    Our Student Support Services

    “Help is available at your fingertips, even in different countries and different time zones.”   Samira Gumma-Swiatkowski, Graduate

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  • Curriculum

  • Tuition and Fees

  • Highlights

  • Faculty

  • Learning Outcomes

  • Program Data

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Choose from a range of specializations. You can also choose a format for your unique learning style.

Course-Based

Self-Directed

Transfer of Credit

If you have completed your M.B.A. or another eligible master’s degree program, you may be able to receive credit for two courses when enrolling in the Ph.D. in Management program, which can save you time and money. Call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336 to learn more.

Find out more about the Ph.D. in Management now.  Request Information

Accounting

The Accounting specialization is designed to help accountants and auditors broaden their knowledge and business skills in various areas, including auditing, budget analysis, financial and international accounting, management accounting, accounting information system consulting, fraud examination, forensic accounting, and tax consulting and preparation services.

Note: Students entering the Accounting specialization in the Ph.D. in Management are expected to have a background in basic accounting, algebra, and calculus, which may be used in the specialization KAMs and dissertation.

Completion Requirements

  • 102 total quarter credits 
    • Foundation course (6 cr.)
    • 3 core Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs I, II, III) (36 cr.)
    • 2 specialized Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs V or VI, and VII) (24 cr.)*
    • Foundation research sequence (12 cr.)
    • Advanced research course (4 cr.)
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (20 cr.)
  • Professional Development Plan
  • Four Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

*Students may substitute three graduate-level courses or two graduate-level courses and an independent study for KAM VII with the approval of their faculty mentor and the program chair, provided that they complete a minimum of two KAMs.

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Foundation Course

Core KAMs

 

KAM I: Principles of Social Change

KAM II: Principles of Human Development

KAM III: Principles of Organizational and Social Systems

Foundation Research Sequence

This sequence provides the student with the background to effectively complete doctoral-level research. The sequence is composed of three online quarter-based courses:

Advanced Research Course

Select one of the following advanced research courses:

Specialized KAMs

Select either KAM V or VI. KAM VII is required.

KAM V: Financial Accounting Theory

KAM VI: Auditing and International Accounting Theory

KAM VII: Research

Dissertation

    • Course Code
    • Course Title
    • Credits

Engineering Management

This specialization allows either practicing engineers who plan a move into management or engineers who are already managers to learn the social and behavioral aspects of management.

Completion Requirements

  • 102 total quarter credits
    • Foundation course (6 cr.)
    • 3 core Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs I, II, III) (36 cr.)
    • 2 specialized Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs V or VI, and VII) (24 cr.)*
    • Foundation research sequence (12 cr.)
    • Advanced research course (4 cr.) 
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (20 cr.)
  • Professional Development Plan
  • Four Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

*Students may substitute three graduate-level courses or two graduate-level courses and an independent study for KAM VII with the approval of their faculty mentor and the program chair, provided that they complete a minimum of two KAMs.

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Foundation Course

Core KAMs

KAM I: Principles of Social Change

KAM II: Principles of Human Development

KAM III: Principles of Organizational and Social Systems

Foundation Research Sequence

This sequence provides the student with the background to effectively complete doctoral-level research. The sequence is composed of three online quarter-based courses:

Advanced Research Course

Select one of the following advanced research courses:

Specialized KAMs

Select either KAM V or VI. KAM VII is required.

KAM V: Engineering Management Quality

KAM VI: Engineering Management of Globally Competitive Goods and Services

KAM VII: Research

Dissertation

    • Course Code
    • Course Title
    • Credits

Finance Course-Based Format

In this specialization, you can develop and use financial models and theoretical tools to help gain an understanding of some of the most challenging national and international financial problems. Pursue original research and advanced knowledge in areas such as corporate finance and financial management. Analyze case studies, incorporate principles of social and behavioral research, and expand your expertise in financial theories, systems, and practices. This specialization can help prepare you for a career in private industry, international agencies, consulting, or teaching.

Completion Requirements

  • 96 total quarter credits 
    • Foundation and core courses (30 cr.)
    • Foundation and advanced research course sequence (16 cr.)
    • Specialization courses (24 cr.)
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (26 cr.) 
  • 4 Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Recommended Course Sequence

Finance Self-Designed Format

In this specialization, you can develop and use financial models and theoretical tools to help gain an understanding of some of the most challenging national and international financial problems. Pursue original research and advanced knowledge in areas such as corporate finance and financial management. Analyze case studies, incorporate principles of social and behavioral research, and expand your expertise in financial theories, systems, and practices. This specialization can help prepare you for a career in private industry, international agencies, consulting, or teaching.

Completion Requirements

  • 102 total quarter credits 
  • Professional Development Plan
  • Four Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

*Students may substitute three graduate-level courses or two graduate-level courses and an independent study for KAM VII with the approval of their faculty mentor and the program chair, provided that they complete a minimum of two KAMs.

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Foundation Course

Core KAMs

KAM I: Principles of Social Change

KAM II: Principles of Human Development

KAM III: Principles of Organizational and Social Systems

Foundation Research Sequence

This sequence provides the student with the background to effectively complete doctoral-level research. The sequence is composed of three online quarter-based courses:

Advanced Research Course

Select one of the following advanced research courses:

Specialized KAMs

Select either KAM V or VI. KAM VII is required.

KAM V: Corporate Financial Theory

KAM VI: Investment and International Finance

KAM VII: Research

Dissertation

    • Course Code
    • Course Title
    • Credits

Human Resource Management

In this specialization, you can apply the latest theories and analytical tools to conduct original research and add to the body of knowledge in areas such as organizational effectiveness, conflict resolution, human capital development, and strategic human resource management. Explore the global and multidisciplinary aspects of human resource management and enhance your ability to develop solutions for strategic human resource initiatives. This specialization can help prepare you for senior positions in private industry, nonprofit organizations, consulting, or teaching.

Completion Requirements

  • 96 total quarter credits 
    • Foundation and core courses (30 cr.)
    • Foundation and advanced research course sequence (16 cr.)
    • Specialization courses (24 cr.)
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (26 cr.) 
  • 4 Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Recommended Course Sequence

Information Systems Management

This specialization provides an integrative approach to managing information systems in today's data-rich environment. Study how to derive maximum value and innovation from investing in organizational systems, and build the leadership skills essential to many successful technology executives. Broaden your understanding of all aspects of e-commerce systems, security management and risk assessment, and system design. Develop your expertise in leading and managing people, processes, and systems, and contribute to positive social change by helping to improve performance through information systems management.

Completion Requirements

  • 96 total quarter credits 
    • Foundation and core courses (30 cr.)
    • Foundation and advanced research course sequence (16 cr.)
    • Specialization courses (24 cr.)
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (26 cr.) 
  • 4 Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Recommended Course Sequence

Leadership and Organizational Change Course-Based Format

In this specialization, you will examine leading-edge as well as traditional models of leadership and organizational structures. You will study ways to promote effective leadership development, strengthened interpersonal relationships, and successful group and organizational dynamics, all of which can lead to improved performance in organizations. Explore ways to mobilize change and work effectively in cross-cultural environments.

Completion Requirements

  • 96 total quarter credits 
    • Foundation and core courses (30 cr.)
    • Foundation and advanced research sequence (16 cr.)
    • Specialization courses (24 cr.)
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (26 cr.)
  • Four Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Recommended Course Sequence

Leadership and Organizational Change Self-Directed Format

In this specialization, you will examine leading-edge as well as traditional models of leadership and organizational structures. You will study ways to promote effective leadership development, strengthened interpersonal relationships, and successful group and organizational dynamics, all of which can lead to improved performance in organizations. Explore ways to mobilize change and work effectively in cross-cultural environments.

Completion Requirements

  • 102 total credits 
    • Foundation course (6 cr.)
    • 3 core Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs I, II, III) (36 cr.)
    • 2 specialized Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs V or VI, and VII) (24 cr.)*
    • Foundation research sequence (12 cr.)
    • Advanced research course (4 cr.)
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (20 cr.)
  • Professional Development Plan
  • Four Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 units

*Students may substitute three graduate-level courses or two graduate-level courses and an independent study for KAM VII with the approval of their faculty mentor and the program chair, provided that they complete a minimum of two KAMs.

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Foundation Course

Core KAMs

KAM I: Principles of Societal Development

KAM II: Principles of Human Development

KAM III: Principles of Organizational and Social Systems

Foundation Research Sequence

This sequence provides the student with the background to effectively complete doctoral-level research. The sequence is composed of three online quarter-based courses:

Advanced Research Course

Select one of the following advanced research courses:

Specialized KAMs

Select either KAM V or VI. KAM VII is required.

KAM V: Leadership Development

KAM VI: Organizational Change Models

KAM VII: Research

Dissertation

    • Course Code
    • Course Title
    • Credits

Operations Research

This specialization (often referred to as management science or by the acronym OR/MS) prepares you to understand new and innovative approaches to operations management.

Completion Requirements

  • 102 total quarter credits 
    • Foundation course (6 cr.)
    • 3 core Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs I, II, III) (36 cr.)
    • 2 specialized Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs V or VI, and VII) (24 cr.)*
    • Foundation research sequence (12 cr.)
    • Advanced research course (4 cr.)
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (20 cr.)
  • Professional Development Plan
  • Four Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

*Students may substitute three graduate-level courses or two graduate-level courses and an independent study for KAM VII with the approval of their faculty mentor and the program chair, provided that they complete a minimum of two KAMs.

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Foundation Course

Core KAMs

KAM I: Principles of Societal and Cultural Development

KAM II: Principles of Human Development

KAM III: Principles of Organizational and Social Systems

Foundation Research Sequence

This sequence provides the student with the background to effectively complete doctoral-level research. The sequence is composed of three online quarter-based courses:

Advanced Research Course

Select one of the following advanced research courses:

Specialized KAMs

Select either KAM V or VI. KAM VII is required.

KAM V: Deterministic Operations Research Techniques

KAM VI: Stochastic Operations Research Techniques

KAM VII: Research

Dissertation

    • Course Code
    • Course Title
    • Credits

Self-Designed

If you have highly focused learning and professional interests, you may undertake a Self-Designed specialization within the existing KAM curriculum structure of the General Program. This allows maximum flexibility in designing a program that will most closely match your professional goals.

Completion Requirements

  • 102 total quarter credits
    • Foundation course (6 cr.)
    • 3 core Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs I, II, III) (36 cr.)
    • 2 specialized Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs V or VI, and VII) (24 cr.)*
    • Foundation research sequence (12 cr.)
    • Advanced research course (4 cr.)
    • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentation (20 cr.)
  • Professional Development Plan
  • Four Ph.D. residencies to equal a minimum of 16 days

*Students may substitute three graduate-level courses or two graduate-level courses and an independent study for KAM VII with the approval of their faculty mentor and the program chair, provided that they complete a minimum of two KAMs.

Time to completion may vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of your time to completion, call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336.

Foundation Course

Core KAMs

KAM I: Principles of Social Change

KAM II: Principles of Human Development

KAM III: Principles of Organizational and Social Systems

Foundation Research Sequence

This sequence provides the student with the background to effectively complete doctoral-level research. The sequence is composed of three online quarter-based courses:

Advanced Research Course

Select one of the following advanced research courses:

Specialized KAMs

Select either KAM V or VI. KAM VII is required.

KAM V: Organizational Dynamics and Development

KAM VI: Decision Sciences

KAM VII: Research

Dissertation

    • Course Code
    • Course Title
    • Credits

Curriculum Component Requirements Cost
Self-Directed Specializations 98–102 total quarter credit hours $4,835 per quarter
Course-Based Specializations 96 total quarter credit hours $645 per quarter credit hour
4-Day Residency Fee 4 during your program
(Residency 2 and Residency 4 may be virtual)
$1,160 each, plus travel, lodging, other expenses
Virtual: $1,260 each
Technology Fee per quarter $120

Tuition and fees are subject to change.

Call 1-866-492-5336 for information about a full range of options for:

No Application Fee - Applying has never been easier.

As a student in Walden’s management Ph.D. program, you can choose when, where, and how you learn thanks to our online format and MobileLearn®. Through this education technology, you can listen to coursework on your MP3 player, access your classroom from your iPhone, download coursework to your laptop, and more.

Find out more about what defines Walden’s Ph.D. in Management program:

10 Steps to your Ph.D. in Management

Watch the short presentation, “10 Steps to Attaining Your Ph.D. in Management,” for an overview of the steps required to complete your doctoral degree in management at Walden. Discover the benefits of the online program; learn how to apply; and explore the program’s specializations, learning models, and dissertation process.

Download Presentation (PDF)

Meet Students and Alumni

Walden’s Ph.D. in Management students and graduates can offer unique insights into learning at Walden. Their firsthand experiences provide a glimpse of what you can expect from a doctoral degree program that takes an interdisciplinary approach to the field of management.

These students and graduates offer feedback about how their experience in Walden’s online Ph.D. in Management program has made a positive impact on their lives and society:

Judith Warren, Ph.D. in Management Student 

“If you’re interested in a rigorous academic experience that will qualify you to make a contribution in your field, consider Walden University.”

Dr. Gregory Campbell, Ph.D. in Management 2012 Graduate

“I am proud to report that I am currently leading a project to develop an executive leadership program that incorporates EI and a full range of leadership skills for a federal law enforcement organization. My Walden experience has truly transformed me into a scholar-practitioner and enhanced my professional knowledge, skills, and abilities.”

Dr. David Finch, Ph.D. in Management 2010 Graduate

“I am a strong proponent of Walden’s vision of a scholar-practitioner. As a full-time academic who is engaged is the scholarly community, I think the traditional silos between academia and ‘the real world’ are relics of the past. Walden’s social change mandate is not only unique, it is inspiring. It challenges every one of us to not only be better scholars but to be better citizens.”

Read Full Story

Anna Siyavora, Ph.D. in Management 2010 Graduate

 “I’m from Phoenix, Ariz., but I’m originally from Zimbabwe. I am the CEO and president of New Hope for Living in Phoenix, and I am already using my Ph.D. to effect positive social change. The organization serves more than 100 children with autism. I’m in the process of trying to open a school in Zimbabwe for children who have disabilities.”

Bob Duhainy, Ph.D. in Management 2010 Graduate

“As a result of earning my Ph.D. at Walden University, I was able to pursue my dream and become a dean of a university in Boston, Mass.”

Vernotto McMillan, Ph.D. in Management 2010 Graduate

“I’ve been a manager at NASA the entire time I attended Walden University. Gaining skills through the Ph.D. in Management program actually made my job a whole lot easier.”

Michael P. Haydock, Ph.D. in Management 2008 Graduate

“Walden’s Ph.D. program’s format and rigor produces the environment for a better outcome. The professors make for the skills and coaching part of the environment and they will only let you fail if you have not done the work or have not made the attempt to succeed. The library is second to none. That leaves it pretty much up to students—how students pursue their dreams is probably the deciding factor in success.”

Mary Schreiber, Ph.D. in Management 1996 Graduate

“I was a mother of three children balancing work and family and strived for advanced education. I needed a curriculum that challenged my intellect and allowed me to maintain the balance of work and family. Walden was the answer!”

Which Doctoral Program is Right for You?

When selecting between Walden’s Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.) and Ph.D. in Management programs, consider which features are right for your learning style and career aspirations. Here are some main differences between the programs to consider as you make your decision. Your enrollment advisor can provide further guidance about these programs.

The Ph.D. in Management may be your best choice if you want to:

  • Deepen my knowledge and understanding of the field of management and to become an expert in one of its subfields.
  • Participate in a traditional doctoral dissertation that results in a scholarly paper.
  • Conduct original academic research with the intent of adding to scholarship in the field.
  • Transition into a faculty teaching position in higher education.
  • Publish research as an expert author.
  • Serve as a leader and expert within my organization.

The D.B.A. program may be your best choice if you want to: 

  • Deepen my understanding of the functional disciplines of business administration.
  • Participate and design a doctoral study based on a real-world project within my organization or business.
  • Execute research-based business strategies within an organization or business.
  • Influence the practical application of management in a leadership position.
  • Assume a leadership position within my organization.
  • Influence my industry as a business consultant.

Which Format is Right for You?

Walden offers you two formats for completing the Ph.D. in Management degree program. To help you determine the format that best fits your learning style and needs, we offer the following comparison.

The course-based format may be your best choice if you want to:

  • Follow a structured program with a specific plan for completion.  
  • Collaborate with peers and faculty members through online discussions and residencies.
  • Pursue a specialization in Finance, Human Resource Management, Information Systems Management, or Leadership and Organizational Change.

The self-directed format may be your best choice if you want to:

  • Structure your own flexible program with the support of a faculty mentor.
  • Immediately focus research papers on your area of interest.
  • Pursue a Self-Designed specialization or a specialization in Accounting, Engineering Management, Finance, Leadership and Organizational Change, or Operations Research.

Transfer of Credit

You may be able to receive credit for four courses when enrolling in the Ph.D. in Management program if you have completed one of the following degree programs: M.B.A., Executive M.B.A., or a master’s in management, organizational management, project management, human resources, human resource management/leadership/development, leadership, marketing, finance, accounting, accounting and management, information systems management, operations management, operations research, international management, supply chain management, or healthcare management. Call an enrollment advisor at 1-866-492-5336 to learn more.

Steps to your Ph.D. in Management

Ten Steps to Ph.D. in Management Video

Watch this step-by-step guide to earning your online doctorate in management at Walden.

Watch Now

Aqueil Ahmad, Ph.D., Aligarh Muslim University, India

Constantine O. Alfred-Ockiya, Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; M.S., The Pennsylvania State University; B.S., Montana Tech of The University of Montana

Amjad Ali, Ph.D., The George Washington University

Robert T. Aubey, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Mexico City College; B.B.A., Lamar University

Alen Badal, Ph.D., Union Institute & University; M.S., National University; B.S., California State University, Stanislaus

David Banner, Ph.D., M.A., Northwestern University; M.B.A., University of Houston; B.S., The University of Texas

Joseph E. Barbeau, Ed.D., Boston University; B.S., Northeastern University

Teresa Bittner, Ph.D., Walden University; B.S., University of California, San Diego

David D. Bouvin, D.B.A., M.B.A., Argosy University; B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College

James Bowman, Ph.D., University of Nebraska; M.A., B.S., University of Wisconsin

William H. Brent, D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University; M.B.A., B.S., The George Washington University

Donna Brown, Ph.D., Kent State University; M.S., B.S., Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania

Mary I. Dereshiwsky, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts; M.S., University of New Haven; B.S., Southern Connecticut State University

Robert F. DeYoung,  Ph.D., Lynn University; M.S., St. Thomas University; B.P.S., Barry University

David F. Dunlap, Ed.D., The University of Alabama; M.A., B.S., Appalachian State University

Al Endres, Ph.D., M.S., Illinois Institute of Technology

Michael Ewald, Ph.D., Entrepreneurial University of Costa Rica; M.P.A., M.B.A., City University; B.S., University at Albany, State University of New York

Javier Fadul, Ph.D., Walden University; M.B.A., LeTourneau University; B.S., Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Colombia

David Finch, Ph.D., Walden University; M.A., University of Kent, Canterbury, England

Judith L. Forbes, Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University; M.B.A., University of Southern California; M.S., B.A., California State University

David Ford, Ph.D., M.S., University of Wisconsin; B.S., Iowa State University

Dean E. Frost, Ph.D., M.S., University of Washington

Gary Gemmill, Ph.D., M.B.A., Michigan State University

James B. Goes, Ph.D., University of Oregon; M.B.A., The University of Utah; B.S., B.B.A., Idaho State University

Stuart Gold, Ph.D., Northcentral University; M.B.A., Loyola University; B.S., Northeastern Illinois University

Jean Gordon, D.B.A., M.S., Nova Southeastern University; BSN, University of Miami

Jayne S. Gorham, Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University; M.A., University of Central Florida

David A. Gould, Ed.D., M.S.E., Seattle University; M.B.A., University of Puget Sound; B.A., University of Washington

Wanda S. Gravett, Ph.D., University of Nebraska; M.H.A., University of Minnesota; B.S., The University of Texas

Gerald R. Griffin, Ed.D., The University of Tulsa; M.B.A., Southern Methodist University

Leila Halawi, D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University; M.S., B.S., Beirut University College

Reza Hamzaee, Ph.D., Arizona State University; M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; B.A., National University of Iran

Pascale Hardy, Ph.D., Pontificia Universita Gregoriana, Italy; M.B.A., The Open University Business School, England

Sunil Hazari, Ed.D., West Virginia University; M.S., Eastern Kentucky University; B.S., The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, India

Lilburn P. Hoehn, Ph.D., Michigan State University; M.Ed., B.S., University of Missouri

Godwin Igein, Ph.D., Union Institute & University; M.B.A., City University of Seattle, Bellevue; B.B.A., The University of Texas at El Paso

Aridaman K. Jain, Ph.D., Purdue University; M.S., Indian Statistical Institute; B.S., Delhi University, India

Susan Jespersen, D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University; M.S., California State University; B.S., University of South Florida

Nicholas Johns, Ph.D., Loughborough University, England; B.S., University of Surrey, England

Yoram Kalman, Ph.D., University of Haifa, Israel; M.B.A., Tel Aviv University, Israel

Robert A. Kilmer, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Naval Postgraduate School; B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Raghu B. Korrapati, Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University; M.B.A., Webster University; M.S., University of South Carolina; M.Tech., Andhra University, India; B.S.E., Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, India

Felix M. Lao, Ph.D., University of Santo Tomas, Philippines; B.B.M., M.B.A., University of the City of Manila, Philippines

Teresa M. Lao, Ph.D., New Mexico State University; M.A., Ball State University; B.A., Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines

Lee W. Lee, Ph.D., M.B.A., University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Robert E. Levasseur, Ph.D., Walden University; M.S., B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; B.A., Bowdoin College

Anthony J. Lolas, Ph.D., Ed.D., University of South Carolina; Ed.S., Troy University; M.B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; B.S., U.S. Air Force Academy

Stephanie N. Lyncheski, D.M., University of Phoenix; M.Ed., Northern Arizona University; M.A., Marquette University; B.A., Ripon College

Christos N. Makrigeorgis, Ph.D., Texas A&M University; M.S., B.S., South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

Branford J. McAllister, Ph.D., Walden University; M.E.A., The George Washington University; M.A., The University of Alabama; B.S., U.S. Air Force Academy

Walter McCollum, Ph.D., Walden University; M.A., Webster University; B.S., The State University of New York

Doreen M. McGunagle, Ph.D., Capella University; M.B.A., Nova Southeastern University

Abraham Meilich, Ph.D., Walden University; M.S., University of Southern California; M.S., Stanford University; B.S., University of California, Los Angeles

David Metcalf II, Ph.D., M.S., Nova Southeastern University; B.A., The University of Texas at Austin

Lawrence “Lonny” R. Ness, Ph.D., Northcentral University; M.B.A., B.S., California State University

John Nirenberg, Ph.D., B.A., University of Connecticut; M.F.A., University of New Orleans; M.S., Southern Connecticut State University;

Robert Parent, Ph.D., M.A., Fielding Graduate University; B.A., Saint Anselm College

Janet Pershing, Ph.D., Walden University; M.A., University of Minnesota; B.A., Carleton College

Jeffrey Prinster, D.B.A., Alliant International University; M.B.A., Drexel University; B.A., Brigham Young University

David J. Pritchard, Ph.D., M.A., B.S., University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Bonnie Rabin, Ph.D., Cornell University

Irmak Renda-Tanali, D.Sc., The George Washington University; M.B.A., M.S., B.S., Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Raafat Saade, Ph.D., Concordia University

Howard B. Schechter, Ed.D., University of Massachusetts; M.Ed., Bay State College; B.A., University at Albany

Richard Schuttler, Ph.D., Walden University; M.S., Chapman University;

Mohammad Sharifzadeh, Ph.D., Walden University; M.Phil., University of Oxford, England; B.Sc., University of Salford, England

Kenneth Sherman, Ph.D., Trident University International; M.B.A., Iona College; M.A., Long Island University

William G. Shriner, Ph.D., M.S., Wayne State University; B.S., Winona State University

Salvatore Sinatra, Ed.D., University of North Carolina; M.A., Hunter College; B.S., Fordham University

Thea Singer, Ph.D., Saybrook University; M.S., University of Cincinnati; B.A., University of Michigan

Marion S. Smith, Ph.D., University of Houston; M.B.A., B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Janice Spangenburg, Ph.D., Regent University; M.S., Troy University; B.A., Saint Leo University

Thomas Spencer,  Ph.D., Stevens Institute of Technology; M.S., New Jersey Institute of Technology; B.S., Newark College of Engineering

Marcia B. Steinhauer, Ph.D., M.A., B.A., University of Florida

James Stewart, D.Sc., The George Washington University; M.S., American University; M.S.E.E., Naval Postgraduate School

Diane Stottlemyer, Ph.D., Northcentral University; M.S., California State University, Dominguez Hills; B.A., Indiana University at Bloomington

Nikunja Swain, Ph.D., University of North Dakota; M.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., B.S., Regional Engineering College, India

Louis Taylor, Ph.D., Walden University; B.S.E.E., Ohio State University

Bharat S. Thakkar, Ph.D., M.S., Illinois Institute of Technology

Steven Tippins, Ph.D., Florida State University; B.S., University of Hartford

Carol M. Wells, Ph.D., University of Connecticut; M.A., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; B.S., University of Bridgeport

Roger F. Wells, Ph.D., M.B.A., Northcentral University; B.S., Portsmouth College of Technology

Elizabeth C. Wilson, Ph.D., Fielding Graduate University; M.B.A., Colorado State University; B.S., Thomas Edison State College

Cheryl S. Winsten-Bartlett, Ph.D., B.A., University of Arizona

Danielle Wright-Babb, Ph.D., Capella University; M.B.A., University of Redlands; B.S., B.A., University of California

Graduates of this program will be prepared to:

  1. Articulate the evolution of the field of management and its relationship to human and societal development.
  2. Analyze various theories, concepts, and tools that seek to explain and provide the basis for management decision-making.
  3. Evaluate management and systems-thinking principles at the core of the design and evolution of organizational and social systems.
  4. Appraise the relevance of seminal, current, and emerging management theories and practices from an interdisciplinary and social-change perspective.
  5. Assess identified gaps in the current research literature in the field of management and in their chosen areas of specialization.
  6. Design efficacious and ethical research that addresses identified gaps in the body of knowledge in management and related sub-fields.
  7. Advance the body of knowledge through original research in the field of management and chosen areas of specialization via the application of a variety of appropriate methodology, design, and analysis methods.
  8. Communicate effectively to academic and general stakeholders the results of original research that advance the field of knowledge in management and chosen specializations and contribute to positive social change.

What’s It Like to Get Your Degree Online?

 What's It Like to Learn Online?

Walden is committed to providing the information you need to make an informed decision about where you pursue your education. Click here to find detailed information for the Ph.D. in Management relating to the types of occupations this program may lead to, completion rate, program costs, and median loan debt of students who have graduated from this program.

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Learn firsthand about the School of Management doctoral programs by viewing these free, hour-long Web seminars.