2011 SCIRHistorically, educational institutions have played an important role in social change—providing knowledge creation and equipping individuals with the tools and practical knowledge needed to address some of society’s greatest needs.
 
At Walden University, we believe knowledge is most valuable when put to use for the greater good, and we’re deeply committed to improving human and social conditions by creating and applying ideas in order to advance society as a whole. Effecting positive social change is at the heart of our mission and has been since our founding in 1970.

In 2011, Walden commissioned Harris Interactive, a global research firm, to conduct an online survey of adults around the world on the topic of social change—defined as involvement in activities that make improvements in the lives of individuals and communities locally and around the world. Designed to provide a barometer of who is engaged in social change, what is important to them and how they work together to advance social change issues of interest now and in the future, the survey explores attitudes, behaviors and motivations of Americans as well as the international community.

The research first examined the current state of social change engagement in America, revealing Americans’ beliefs about social change, the issues they care about, the motivations behind their engagement, the actions they take to further social change and the tools they use.

The research was then expanded to include the international views of more than 12,000 adults from Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Japan, Mexico, and Spain as well as the United States. The global survey similarly gauged adults’ perceptions on the importance of social change, the top issues in their country, and the future of social change from a global perspective.

Our hope is that the Social Change Impact Report will spur local, national, and global discussions about the advancement of social change among business and government leaders, educators, healthcare workers, nonprofit organization employees, and those who simply care about making a difference.

The survey results are now available in the first-ever Social Change Impact Report.

  • FAST FACT

    “Think globally, act locally” has become a worldwide mentality, with a majority of adults in countries around the world (73%, on average) agreeing that what happens in communities in other parts of the world affects their local community, most commonly in Spain (82%) and Japan (81%).

  • FAST FACT

    Most adults in countries around the world (89%, on average) agree that technology can turn a cause into a movement faster than anything else can, particularly those in Spain (93%), Canada (91%), Brazil (91%), Great Britain (91%), and China (91%).

  • FAST FACT

    92% of American adults have taken action to engage in positive social change in the past year. (March 2011)

  • FAST FACT

    On average, 81% of adults say involvement in positive social change is important to them personally, and adults in Mexico (95%), Brazil (93%), China (91%), and India (91%) are most likely to agree.

  • Executive Summary

  • Resources for Media

  • In The News

Social Change Impact Report: Global Survey

Expanded to include the international views of more than 12,000 adults from Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Japan, Mexico and Spain as well as the United States, the Global Survey similarly gauges adults’ perceptions on the importance of social change, the top issues in their country and the future of social change providing a global perspective. (September 2011)

Executive Summary with graphs (PDF)
Appendix (PDF)
Infographics 

Social Change Impact Report: America Survey

The Social Change Impact Report provides a detailed picture of the state of social change engagement in America, including: Americans’ beliefs about social change, the issues they care about, the motivations behind their engagement, the actions they are taking to further social change and the tools they use. (March 2011)

Executive Summary with graphs (PDF)
Summary Report with detailed findings (PDF)
Infographics

For more information on the Social Change Impact Report, including the methodology and a questionnaire providing answers to each survey question, please contact Jen Raider at 1-443-627-7452 or jen.raider@waldenu.edu.

To join the conversation on Twitter, follow #ImpactReport.

Slide from social change omnibus showing chart on student results.

Walden Students' Perceptions About Social Change

Survey findings reveal majority of Walden students consider themselves to be change agents.

Learn More

Social Change Impact Report: Global Survey

Executive Summary with graphs (PDF) 
Appendix (PDF) 
Press Release (Digital Technology)
Press Release (Global Phenomenon)

Graphics

Digital Technology SCIR 2011

Infographic: Digital technology is a global game-changer for social change. Social networking is the most common way young adults use digital technology to engage in social change.
(WEB) (PDF) (PNG) (JPEG)

Global Social Change 2011

Infographic: Social change is a global state of mind. Social change issues of greatest importance vary by country and gender. In many countries, more people say involvement in social change is important than those who have taken action.
(WEB) (PDF) (PNG) (JPEG)

Social Change Impact Report: America Survey

Executive Summary with additional graphics (PDF) 
Summary Report including more detailed findings (PDF)
Press Release

Graphics and Multimedia

SCIR 2011 Local

Infographic: The future of social change lives in the power of the individual and digital technology will fuel that power. The social change issues of the future are both global and local.
(WEB) (PDF) (PNG) (JPEG)

SCIR 2011 Engage

Infographic: Social change is important to Americans. Education is seen as the pathway to engage in social change as well as an important outcome of social change—now and in the future.
(WEB) (PDF) (PNG) (JPEG)

SCIR 2011 America

Infographic: Social change is important to Americans and it is Baby Boomers and Matures who are taking action and running the engine of social change in America.
(WEB) (PDF) (PNG) (JPEG)

Watch Now

Watch the video (via WaldenU.edu or YouTube)

PowerPoint (PDF)

For more information on the Social Change Impact Report, including the methodology and a questionnaire providing answers to each survey question, please contact Jen Raider at 1-443-627-7452 or jen.raider@waldenu.edu.

To join the conversation on Twitter, follow #ImpactReport.

News Releases

Social Change Impact Report in the News

To join the conversation on Twitter, follow #ImpactReport.