February is Black History Month.

To celebrate, Walden University is bringing together our community of students, alumni, faculty, and staff to acknowledge our appreciation of the accomplishments of remarkable African Americans and demonstrate our commitment to continue in their footsteps to create change in our communities, our nations, and the world.

Together, let’s rediscover the many achievements of African Americans—past or present, famous or not—who inspire us to make a difference now and in the future.

  • Black History Month Logo

  • Events

  • On-Demand Webinars

  • Recommended Reading List

  • Articles and Videos

Participate in these events during Black History Month:

Facebook Chat

“Inspiring the Next Generation of African-American Leaders”
Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, 1 p.m. Eastern time

Join us at www.facebook.com/WaldenU for an engaging and informative discussion with Chris Rey, 2007 B.S. in Business Administration graduate and mayor of Spring Lake, N.C.

Live Webinar

“Celebrating the Contributions of African Americans”
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, 7–8 p.m. Eastern time
Watch the Archived Webinar now.

Join us for a live webinar about inspiring African Americans—past or present, famous or not—who have significantly influenced education, research, or social change initiatives.

The webinar will feature members of the Walden community sharing their personal insights about African Americans who have inspired them, the lessons learned from their experiences, and the lasting impact these remarkable individuals have made.

Panelists:

Media Contacts

For more information, please contact:

Tamara Chumley
1-443-627-7495
tamara.chumley@waldenu.edu

Jerry Sweitzer
1-410-843-6576
jerry.sweitzer@waldenu.edu

Jen Raider
1-443-627-7452
jen.raider@waldenu.edu

Members of the Walden community have recorded on-demand webinars about African Americans who have inspired them. Watch and learn more about these extraordinary change-makers, and please share the webinars with your family, friends, and colleagues.

Click on the title to view:

Coming soon:

  • “Martin Luther King Jr. Retroflection”
    Dr. James W. Thomasson, faculty member, The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership

"Alma Powell"

Dr. Chastity W. Lasley, Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) graduate

"African-American Accomplishments Past to Present"

Dr. Desiree DePriest, faculty member, The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership

Join us for a live webinar about inspiring African Americans—past or present, famous or not—who have significantly influenced education, research, or social change initiatives.

The webinar will feature members of the Walden community sharing their personal insights about African Americans who have inspired them, the lessons learned from their experiences, and the lasting impact these remarkable individuals have made.

"Rosa Parks"

Dr. Barbara Abraham, Ph.D. in Education graduate

"The Pact: Drs. Sampson Davis, George Jenkins, and Rameck Hun"

Curtis E. Alston, Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) student

In honor of Black History Month, Walden students, alumni, faculty members, and staff members have recommended the following books to read in February and throughout the year.

Across That Bridge: Life Lessons and a Vision for Change
John Lewis

"Congressman John Lewis links the civil rights era to current social change.. He says it best: 'To truly revolutionize our society, we must first revolutionize ourselves.' True change starts within."

Doris Watson
2010 Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) graduate

Black Students and School Failure
Jacqueline Jordan Irvine

“I recommend this book because it presents and discusses the severity of the achievement gap for black students.  This book, in my opinion, is a classic because Dr. Irvine offers solutions that work from a political, practical, and prescriptive standpoint.  She thoroughly discusses the role of culture, race, and social class, which are very important factors often overlooked and dismissed in today’s classroom, be it P-12 or adult and higher education.”

Dr. Kelley Costner
Associate Dean, The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership

Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity
Marcia Alesan Dawkins

“Dr. Dawkins is a contributing faculty member in the College of Undergraduate Studies. This book is based on her dissertation, which won just about every award it could in the communication studies discipline.”

Dr. Jon Paulson
Program Director, College of Undergraduate Studies

Daughters of Thunder: Black Women Preachers and Their Sermons 1850-1979
Bettye Collier-Thomas
 
“Having grown up in the black church, a sermon can soothe your soul, shake you up and inspire. Daughters of Thunder reminds me of my spiritual roots through the voices of women who paved the way for me to be here.”

Donna Albro
Faculty, College of Undergraduate Studies

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
Frederick Douglass

“This well-written autobiographical sketch of Douglass’ life presents a vivid depiction of the slave experience. As an African American, this book provided me an image of the early African-American experience that has encouraged me to persevere. Douglass’ desire to learn and remain a lifelong learner has inspired me to make education a focal part of my life.”

Dr. Salimah McCallum
2012 Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) graduate

The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965–1972
Ibram Rogers

“I think we tend to forget that the education of African Americans in this country has a very long history and can be broken down into several distinct eras. This is one view of a very tumultuous time worth remembering.”

Jennie Ver Steeg
Director of Library Services

The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes (Vintage Classics)
Langston Hughes

“Langston Hughes has always been a favorite poet of mine from childhood onward. This phenomenal African-American poet wrote poems about the struggles of blacks to the awesome wonders of being black. Poems written of love found and love lost. As someone once said, ‘his poems are a historical treasure.’”

Kimberly Richardson
2012 Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) graduate

The Confessions of Nat Turner
William Styron

“This book is a powerful statement about the power of education to free the spirit, the mind, and the whole person.”

Dr. Sylvia Kaneko
Faculty and Doctoral Mentor, School of Counseling and Social Service

The Little Black Book of Success: Laws of Leadership for Black Women
Elaine Meryl Brown, Marsha Haygood, and Rhonda Joy McLean

“This book has been called a mentor in the pocket. There have been so many times that I have had experiences as a leader to which very few people could relate. I have really enjoyed finding out that I am not weird, strange, or different because of my experiences, and I really appreciate the opportunity to benefit from the advice of informed others.”

Dr. Savitri Dixon-Saxon
Associate Dean, School of Counseling and Social Service

The Making of a Black Scholar: From Georgia to the Ivy League
Horace A. Porter

“I recommend this book because the author found himself in Iowa after a very distinguished career and made some sense of it and peace with it.”

Jennie Ver Steeg
Director of Library Services

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration
Isabel Wilkerson

“This book tells the story of the African-American migration from the southern states to the north. The stories are factual but written in the style of a captivating novel. As an African American whose parents had southern roots, it was like being privy to a part of their lives that forever shaped mine. A great read.”

Dr. Cheryl El-Amin
2010 Ph.D. in Human Services graduate

Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston

“Written by one of greatest authors of the Harlem Renaissance, Hurston’s novel was also critically acclaimed and controversial. The fictional story is a narrative about an attractive African-American woman’s journey, set in Florida during the early years of 20th century.”

Shana Payton
2012 Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) graduate

Thrall: Poems
Natasha Trethewey

“Natasha Trethewey is the 2012–13 U.S. Poet Laureate. Thrall explores themes most connected to Natasha’s personal life, such as her love for history, the South, and being a biracial woman in America.”

Dr. Kizzy M. Parks
Faculty, School of Psychology

Up From Slavery
Booker T. Washington

“This is one of my favorite books. Period. It is not only a wonderful account of the period in our history when we went from a slave-bound country to a free state. It is also a wonderful account of what it means to evolve from an enslaved man or woman to a free and accomplished leader. Furthermore, it was written during a time when men and women could not take freedom or education for granted. It is an inspiring book.”

Sheri Muntean
2012 M.S. in Psychology graduate

While the World Watched: A Birmingham Bombing Survivor Comes of Age During the Civil Rights Movement
Carolyn Maull McKinstry

“This is a particularly poignant exploration of what took place in the South at the beginning of the civil rights movement and how racial relations have changed since then. It is especially meaningful to me, as my aunt, the Rev. Phyllis Edwards, marched with Dr. King.”

Dr. Pamela Legner
Faculty, School of Management

Media Contacts

For more information, please contact:

Tamara Chumley
1-443-627-7495
tamara.chumley@waldenu.edu

Jerry Sweitzer
1-410-843-6576
jerry.sweitzer@waldenu.edu

Jen Raider
1-443-627-7452
jen.raider@waldenu.edu

Many Walden students and alumni are continuing in the tradition of great African Americans to create positive change in society. In honor of Black History Month, we are honored to share 10 of their stories.

Walden has hosted internationally known African-American speakers on issues of importance to all of those seeking to make a difference in the world. To commemorate Black History Month, we invite you to listen to their words again and share them with others.

Media Contacts

For more information, please contact:

Tamara Chumley
1-443-627-7495
tamara.chumley@waldenu.edu

Jerry Sweitzer
1-410-843-6576
jerry.sweitzer@waldenu.edu

Jen Raider
1-443-627-7452
jen.raider@waldenu.edu